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Article: Mental health first aid training for the Chinese community in Melbourne, Australia: Effects on knowledge about and attitudes toward people with mental illness

TitleMental health first aid training for the Chinese community in Melbourne, Australia: Effects on knowledge about and attitudes toward people with mental illness
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
International Journal Of Mental Health Systems, 2010, v. 4 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The aim of this study was to investigate in members of the Chinese community in Melbourne the impact of Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training on knowledge about mental disorders and on attitudes to people with mental illness. The hypotheses were that at the end of the training participants would have increased knowledge of mental disorders and related treatments, and decreased negative attitudes towards people with mental disorders.Methods: Respondents were 108 participants of three MHFA training workshops for the Chinese community in Melbourne conducted by a qualified MHFA trainer. Participants completed the research questionnaire prior to the commencement of the training (pre-test) and at its completion (post-test). The questionnaires assessed participants' ability to recognize a mental disorder (depression and schizophrenia) described in the vignettes, knowledge about the professional help and treatment, and negative attitudes towards people with mental illness.Results: Between pre- and post-test there was significant improvement in the recognition of mental disorders, beliefs about treatment became more concordant with health professionals, and negative attitudes reduced.Conclusion: The MHFA training course for general members of the Chinese community in Melbourne produced significant positive change in the level of mental health literacy and reductions in stigmatizing attitudes. The evidence from this study, together with the accumulated evidence of the benefits of MHFA training in the general Australian community, suggests that this approach should be scaled up to a level where it can have an impact on the whole of the Chinese community in Australia. © 2010 Lam et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172237
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.229
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.484
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, AYKen_US
dc.contributor.authorJorm, AFen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, DFKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:20:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:20:51Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Mental Health Systems, 2010, v. 4en_US
dc.identifier.issn1752-4458en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172237-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The aim of this study was to investigate in members of the Chinese community in Melbourne the impact of Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training on knowledge about mental disorders and on attitudes to people with mental illness. The hypotheses were that at the end of the training participants would have increased knowledge of mental disorders and related treatments, and decreased negative attitudes towards people with mental disorders.Methods: Respondents were 108 participants of three MHFA training workshops for the Chinese community in Melbourne conducted by a qualified MHFA trainer. Participants completed the research questionnaire prior to the commencement of the training (pre-test) and at its completion (post-test). The questionnaires assessed participants' ability to recognize a mental disorder (depression and schizophrenia) described in the vignettes, knowledge about the professional help and treatment, and negative attitudes towards people with mental illness.Results: Between pre- and post-test there was significant improvement in the recognition of mental disorders, beliefs about treatment became more concordant with health professionals, and negative attitudes reduced.Conclusion: The MHFA training course for general members of the Chinese community in Melbourne produced significant positive change in the level of mental health literacy and reductions in stigmatizing attitudes. The evidence from this study, together with the accumulated evidence of the benefits of MHFA training in the general Australian community, suggests that this approach should be scaled up to a level where it can have an impact on the whole of the Chinese community in Australia. © 2010 Lam et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Mental Health Systemsen_US
dc.titleMental health first aid training for the Chinese community in Melbourne, Australia: Effects on knowledge about and attitudes toward people with mental illnessen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, DFK: dfkwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, DFK=rp00593en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1752-4458-4-18en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20576137-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954317793en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954317793&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume4en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000208218900018-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, AYK=42561610400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJorm, AF=7102651196en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, DFK=35231716600en_US

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