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Article: Mental health of Chinese migrant workers in factories in Shenzhen, China: Effects of migration stress and social competence

TitleMental health of Chinese migrant workers in factories in Shenzhen, China: Effects of migration stress and social competence
Authors
KeywordsMental Health
Migrant Workers In Factories
Migration Stress
Quality Of Life
Social Competence
Issue Date2010
PublisherHaworth Social Work Practice Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.haworthpress.com/web/SWMH
Citation
Social Work In Mental Health, 2010, v. 8 n. 4, p. 305-318 How to Cite?
AbstractThe present study aimed to examine the mental health conditions of migrant workers in factories in Shenzhen, China, and to examine the effects of migration stress and social competence on the mental health of these migrants. A total of 582 migrant workers were recruited from 17 factories scattered in 8 different industries. The mental health situations of the migrant workers were assessed using the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). The migrant workers' migration stress and social competence were measured by the Migration Stress Scale and Social Competence Scale. The results suggest that migrant workers experienced four major clusters of psychiatric symptoms: interpersonal sensitivity, obsessive compulsion, depression, and hostility. Regression analysis revealed that migration stress and social competence significantly predicted the migrant workers' mental health. Migration stress alone explained 23% of the variance. Specifically, "financial and employment difficulties" and lack of social life significantly predicted the mental health of the migrant workers. In the area of social competence, "social skills and language learning" and "personal characteristics" exerted significant effects on the mental health of migrant workers. In conclusion, social policies concerning migrant workers should aim at facilitating adjustments among migrant workers employed by factories in China. Prevention and treatment programs to improve the mental health of migrant workers in factories should also be implemented. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172236
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.263
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, DFKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, YLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:20:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:20:51Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationSocial Work In Mental Health, 2010, v. 8 n. 4, p. 305-318en_US
dc.identifier.issn1533-2985en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172236-
dc.description.abstractThe present study aimed to examine the mental health conditions of migrant workers in factories in Shenzhen, China, and to examine the effects of migration stress and social competence on the mental health of these migrants. A total of 582 migrant workers were recruited from 17 factories scattered in 8 different industries. The mental health situations of the migrant workers were assessed using the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). The migrant workers' migration stress and social competence were measured by the Migration Stress Scale and Social Competence Scale. The results suggest that migrant workers experienced four major clusters of psychiatric symptoms: interpersonal sensitivity, obsessive compulsion, depression, and hostility. Regression analysis revealed that migration stress and social competence significantly predicted the migrant workers' mental health. Migration stress alone explained 23% of the variance. Specifically, "financial and employment difficulties" and lack of social life significantly predicted the mental health of the migrant workers. In the area of social competence, "social skills and language learning" and "personal characteristics" exerted significant effects on the mental health of migrant workers. In conclusion, social policies concerning migrant workers should aim at facilitating adjustments among migrant workers employed by factories in China. Prevention and treatment programs to improve the mental health of migrant workers in factories should also be implemented. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHaworth Social Work Practice Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.haworthpress.com/web/SWMHen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Work in Mental Healthen_US
dc.subjectMental Healthen_US
dc.subjectMigrant Workers In Factoriesen_US
dc.subjectMigration Stressen_US
dc.subjectQuality Of Lifeen_US
dc.subjectSocial Competenceen_US
dc.titleMental health of Chinese migrant workers in factories in Shenzhen, China: Effects of migration stress and social competenceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, DFK: dfkwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, DFK=rp00593en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/15332980903217768en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953900376en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953900376&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage305en_US
dc.identifier.epage318en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, DFK=35231716600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChang, YL=23990050500en_US

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