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Article: The resilience of migrant workers in Shanghai China: The roles of migration stress and meaning of migration

TitleThe resilience of migrant workers in Shanghai China: The roles of migration stress and meaning of migration
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105597
Citation
International Journal Of Social Psychiatry, 2008, v. 54 n. 2, p. 131-143 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: In China, more than 10 million rural migrants move to cities every year. Because of the Household Registration System, migrant workers are not entitled to subsidised housing, education, social security or medical benefits. Aims: Using a resilience perspective, this study attempted to explore not only the migration stress that is experienced by migrant workers, but also the protective function of meaning of migration in helping migrant workers withstand the stress of migration. Method: A survey design with multistage cluster sampling was used and 475 migrant workers were recruited. The questionnaire contained demographic data, the Brief Symptom Inventory, a migration stress scale and meaning of migration scale. Results: Financial and employment difficulties stood out as the most stressful issues for migrant workers. More financial and material gains and personal aspirations and achievement were the most common reasons for living in Shanghai. Regression analyses revealed that financial and employment difficulties and interpersonal tensions and conflicts significantly predicted the mental health of both male and female migrant workers. In addition, while marital status significantly predicted the mental health of male migrant workers, the subscale 'more financial and material gains' in the meaning of migration scale predicted the mental health of female migrant workers. Finally, there was a moderating effect of meaning of migration on the mental health of female migrant workers. Conclusion: There is a need to consolidate and develop policies to protect the rights of migrant workers in China. Mental health counselling for migrant workers who are experiencing difficulties living in Shanghai should be introduced. © SAGE Publications, Inc. 2008.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172189
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.361
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.488
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, DFKen_US
dc.contributor.authorSong, HXen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:20:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:20:36Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Social Psychiatry, 2008, v. 54 n. 2, p. 131-143en_US
dc.identifier.issn0020-7640en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172189-
dc.description.abstractBackground: In China, more than 10 million rural migrants move to cities every year. Because of the Household Registration System, migrant workers are not entitled to subsidised housing, education, social security or medical benefits. Aims: Using a resilience perspective, this study attempted to explore not only the migration stress that is experienced by migrant workers, but also the protective function of meaning of migration in helping migrant workers withstand the stress of migration. Method: A survey design with multistage cluster sampling was used and 475 migrant workers were recruited. The questionnaire contained demographic data, the Brief Symptom Inventory, a migration stress scale and meaning of migration scale. Results: Financial and employment difficulties stood out as the most stressful issues for migrant workers. More financial and material gains and personal aspirations and achievement were the most common reasons for living in Shanghai. Regression analyses revealed that financial and employment difficulties and interpersonal tensions and conflicts significantly predicted the mental health of both male and female migrant workers. In addition, while marital status significantly predicted the mental health of male migrant workers, the subscale 'more financial and material gains' in the meaning of migration scale predicted the mental health of female migrant workers. Finally, there was a moderating effect of meaning of migration on the mental health of female migrant workers. Conclusion: There is a need to consolidate and develop policies to protect the rights of migrant workers in China. Mental health counselling for migrant workers who are experiencing difficulties living in Shanghai should be introduced. © SAGE Publications, Inc. 2008.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105597en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Social Psychiatryen_US
dc.subject.meshAchievementen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAspirations (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCitiesen_US
dc.subject.meshCivil Rightsen_US
dc.subject.meshConflict (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.meshEconomicsen_US
dc.subject.meshEmigration And Immigration - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLife Change Eventsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonality Inventoryen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychological - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTransients And Migrants - Psychology - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshUnemploymenten_US
dc.subject.meshUrban Populationen_US
dc.titleThe resilience of migrant workers in Shanghai China: The roles of migration stress and meaning of migrationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, DFK: dfkwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, DFK=rp00593en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0020764007083877en_US
dc.identifier.pmid18488407-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-40149111209en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-40149111209&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume54en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage131en_US
dc.identifier.epage143en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000254851900005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, DFK=35231716600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSong, HX=14066660000en_US

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