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Article: Prevalence and correlates of depression in Chinese oldest-old

TitlePrevalence and correlates of depression in Chinese oldest-old
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4294
Citation
International Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2005, v. 20 n. 1, p. 41-50 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. In Hong Kong, the aged population will be increased rapidly in the coming three decades and the oldest-old (aged 80 and above) is the fastest growing age group. In this paper, we examined the prevalence rate and the correlates of depression for the oldest-old. Method. This article analyzes cross-sectional data collected from a representative community sample of 1903 Chinese elderly people aged 60 or above in Hong Kong. Respondents were interviewed in face-to-face format with structural questionnaire. Result. Using 8 as the cut-off point for the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale, we found that the prevalence rate was greater for the oldest-old (31.1% ± 9.7%) than for the young-old (aged between 60 and 69; 19.1% ± 2.8%) and the old-old (aged 70 and 79; 22.4% ± 4.2%) groups. Logistic regression analyses revealed that financial strain, poor self-rated health, loneliness, and heart disease were significantly and positively related to depression in the oldest-old after gender, marital status, education, living arrangement, functional disability, sensory impairment, cognitive ability, and the presence of eight medical conditions were controlled. Interestingly, financial strain, self-rated health, and loneliness were found to be significant correlates of depression in the young-old and the old-old groups, too. Conclusion. Depression is a serious problem for the oldest-old but a number of correlates are consistently identified in the oldest-old, as well as the two other age groups in the elderly population. Therefore, aged care service practitioners must take these correlates into consideration in their prevention and treatment for depression for all different age groups in the aged. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172095
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.699
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.382
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChou, KLen_US
dc.contributor.authorChi, Ien_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:20:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:20:06Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2005, v. 20 n. 1, p. 41-50en_US
dc.identifier.issn0885-6230en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172095-
dc.description.abstractBackground. In Hong Kong, the aged population will be increased rapidly in the coming three decades and the oldest-old (aged 80 and above) is the fastest growing age group. In this paper, we examined the prevalence rate and the correlates of depression for the oldest-old. Method. This article analyzes cross-sectional data collected from a representative community sample of 1903 Chinese elderly people aged 60 or above in Hong Kong. Respondents were interviewed in face-to-face format with structural questionnaire. Result. Using 8 as the cut-off point for the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale, we found that the prevalence rate was greater for the oldest-old (31.1% ± 9.7%) than for the young-old (aged between 60 and 69; 19.1% ± 2.8%) and the old-old (aged 70 and 79; 22.4% ± 4.2%) groups. Logistic regression analyses revealed that financial strain, poor self-rated health, loneliness, and heart disease were significantly and positively related to depression in the oldest-old after gender, marital status, education, living arrangement, functional disability, sensory impairment, cognitive ability, and the presence of eight medical conditions were controlled. Interestingly, financial strain, self-rated health, and loneliness were found to be significant correlates of depression in the young-old and the old-old groups, too. Conclusion. Depression is a serious problem for the oldest-old but a number of correlates are consistently identified in the oldest-old, as well as the two other age groups in the elderly population. Therefore, aged care service practitioners must take these correlates into consideration in their prevention and treatment for depression for all different age groups in the aged. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4294en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatryen_US
dc.subject.meshAge Distributionen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorder - Complications - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFractures, Bone - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Statusen_US
dc.subject.meshHeart Diseases - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIncomeen_US
dc.subject.meshLoneliness - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshVision Disorders - Complicationsen_US
dc.titlePrevalence and correlates of depression in Chinese oldest-olden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChou, KL: klchou@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChou, KL=rp00583en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/gps.1246en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15578666-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-11844275350en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-11844275350&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume20en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage41en_US
dc.identifier.epage50en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChou, KL=7201905320en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChi, I=7005697907en_US

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