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Article: The nuisance factor: A study of daily stress for people with long-term psychiatric disabilities

TitleThe nuisance factor: A study of daily stress for people with long-term psychiatric disabilities
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherNational Rehabilitation Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nationalrehab.org
Citation
Journal Of Rehabilitation, 1999, v. 65 n. 2, p. 36-41 How to Cite?
AbstractThe present study examined the relationship among daily stresses, coping behaviors and level of symptoms and functioning. Fifty community-residing participants with long-term psychiatric disabilities in New Zealand were interviewed and their mental health status was independently assessed by health care workers. On average, participants showed only transient symptoms and no more than slight impairment in psychosocial functioning. Participants reported having few stresses but rated them at a medium level of severity. Individuals' life roles and environment or world context influenced the types of stress reported by the participants. The top three coping behaviors were: active thinking, active behavior, and reinterpretation and growth. Individuals who were engaged in employment tended to report fewer stresses than those who were not employed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172078
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.667
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.359
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTse, SSKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:20:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:20:01Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Rehabilitation, 1999, v. 65 n. 2, p. 36-41en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-4154en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172078-
dc.description.abstractThe present study examined the relationship among daily stresses, coping behaviors and level of symptoms and functioning. Fifty community-residing participants with long-term psychiatric disabilities in New Zealand were interviewed and their mental health status was independently assessed by health care workers. On average, participants showed only transient symptoms and no more than slight impairment in psychosocial functioning. Participants reported having few stresses but rated them at a medium level of severity. Individuals' life roles and environment or world context influenced the types of stress reported by the participants. The top three coping behaviors were: active thinking, active behavior, and reinterpretation and growth. Individuals who were engaged in employment tended to report fewer stresses than those who were not employed.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNational Rehabilitation Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nationalrehab.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Rehabilitationen_US
dc.titleThe nuisance factor: A study of daily stress for people with long-term psychiatric disabilitiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, SSK: samsont@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTse, SSK=rp00627en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0039440655en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0039440655&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume65en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage36en_US
dc.identifier.epage41en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, SSK=7006643163en_US

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