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Article: How does work work for people with bipolar affective disorder?

TitleHow does work work for people with bipolar affective disorder?
Authors
KeywordsBipolar Disorders
Employment Performance
Mood Disorder
Psychiatric Disability
Vocational Rehabilitation
Issue Date2001
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/112094317
Citation
Occupational Therapy International, 2001, v. 8 n. 3, p. 210-225 How to Cite?
AbstractDespite modern treatments, bipolar disorder remains a chronic, relapsing disorder that leads to long-term psychosocial disability. A review of the literature suggests that while employment rates amongst individuals with bipolar disorder may improve over time, and are relatively better compared to some other chronic mental disorders, employment prospects do not match the high scholastic achievements seen amongst this group of people before the onset of their illness. For those with bipolar disorder, clinical recovery does not necessarily mean functional recovery, and the usual early age of onset may further reduce an individual's preparedness for employment. Two brief vignettes are used to discuss how occupational therapists can help their clients maintain their sense of hope in vocational recovery, gain better self-awareness and work with clients at various stages of recovery rather than waiting for full functional recovery. Further research is required to help identify specific factors that contribute to the success of employment integration amongst people with bipolar disorder.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172054
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.683
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.461
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTse, SSen_US
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, AESen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:19:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:19:51Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationOccupational Therapy International, 2001, v. 8 n. 3, p. 210-225en_US
dc.identifier.issn0966-7903en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172054-
dc.description.abstractDespite modern treatments, bipolar disorder remains a chronic, relapsing disorder that leads to long-term psychosocial disability. A review of the literature suggests that while employment rates amongst individuals with bipolar disorder may improve over time, and are relatively better compared to some other chronic mental disorders, employment prospects do not match the high scholastic achievements seen amongst this group of people before the onset of their illness. For those with bipolar disorder, clinical recovery does not necessarily mean functional recovery, and the usual early age of onset may further reduce an individual's preparedness for employment. Two brief vignettes are used to discuss how occupational therapists can help their clients maintain their sense of hope in vocational recovery, gain better self-awareness and work with clients at various stages of recovery rather than waiting for full functional recovery. Further research is required to help identify specific factors that contribute to the success of employment integration amongst people with bipolar disorder.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/112094317en_US
dc.relation.ispartofOccupational Therapy Internationalen_US
dc.subjectBipolar Disordersen_US
dc.subjectEmployment Performanceen_US
dc.subjectMood Disorderen_US
dc.subjectPsychiatric Disabilityen_US
dc.subjectVocational Rehabilitationen_US
dc.titleHow does work work for people with bipolar affective disorder?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, SS: samsont@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTse, SS=rp00627en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035702153en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035702153&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage210en_US
dc.identifier.epage225en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, SS=7006643163en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWalsh, AES=7202635452en_US

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