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Article: From rhetoric to reality: Use of randomised controlled trials in evidence-based occupational therapy

TitleFrom rhetoric to reality: Use of randomised controlled trials in evidence-based occupational therapy
Authors
KeywordsHealth Care
Professional Practice
Research
Issue Date2000
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/AOT
Citation
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 2000, v. 47 n. 4, p. 181-185 How to Cite?
AbstractEvidence-based practice is one of several emerging 'hot' topics in the field of health care, with occupational therapy being no exception. Indeed, it is only right to take the time to assess the evidence for and against new and/or established treatments to ensure that our clients are receiving the best possible care. Randomised controlled trials are considered the gold standard of providing the evidence on effectiveness of therapeutic intervention. In the field of occupational therapy, we argue that it is not always possible or appropriate to use randomised control trials as either a source of evidence, or a means to establish evidence to support the everyday practice of occupational therapy. High quality observational studies and single system research studies are proposed as viable alternatives to provide evidence on effectiveness of occupational therapy intervention.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172037
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.404
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.590
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTse, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorBlackwood, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorPenman, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:19:46Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:19:46Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationAustralian Occupational Therapy Journal, 2000, v. 47 n. 4, p. 181-185en_US
dc.identifier.issn0045-0766en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172037-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based practice is one of several emerging 'hot' topics in the field of health care, with occupational therapy being no exception. Indeed, it is only right to take the time to assess the evidence for and against new and/or established treatments to ensure that our clients are receiving the best possible care. Randomised controlled trials are considered the gold standard of providing the evidence on effectiveness of therapeutic intervention. In the field of occupational therapy, we argue that it is not always possible or appropriate to use randomised control trials as either a source of evidence, or a means to establish evidence to support the everyday practice of occupational therapy. High quality observational studies and single system research studies are proposed as viable alternatives to provide evidence on effectiveness of occupational therapy intervention.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/AOTen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAustralian Occupational Therapy Journalen_US
dc.subjectHealth Careen_US
dc.subjectProfessional Practiceen_US
dc.subjectResearchen_US
dc.titleFrom rhetoric to reality: Use of randomised controlled trials in evidence-based occupational therapyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, S: samsont@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTse, S=rp00627en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1440-1630.2000.00242.xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034528796en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034528796&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume47en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage181en_US
dc.identifier.epage185en_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, S=7006643163en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBlackwood, K=18533376400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPenman, M=36871917300en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike5027512-

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