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Article: Medication adherence and subjective weight perception in patients with first-episode psychotic disorder

TitleMedication adherence and subjective weight perception in patients with first-episode psychotic disorder
Authors
KeywordsAdherence
Antipsychotics
First-Episode Psychotic Disorder
Weight Dissatisfaction
Weight Perception
Issue Date2011
Citation
Clinical Schizophrenia And Related Psychoses, 2011, v. 5 n. 3, p. 135-141 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Medication adherence is critical to the management of psychotic disorder. Different factors associated with medication adherence have been investigated in previous studies. However, the association with subjective weight perception, which is related to the weight gain side effect of antipsychotics, has not been thoroughly investigated. Subjective weight perception may not equal objective weight status. This study tests the hypothesis that medication adherence is related to subjective weight perception in a group of patients with first-episode psychotic disorder who have taken antipsychotics for one year. Methods: This study recruited 160 participants with one-year histories of first-episode psychotic disorder and measured their actual and perceived weights, amount of weight gain in the past year, body size satisfaction and medication adherence levels. The associations between medication adherence and both the actual and perceived weight status were analyzed controlling for other confounding factors including insight, drug attitude, illness severity and other medication side effects. Results: Stepwise multiple regression analysis found that the participants' perceived weight status, negative attitude toward their drugs and insight were the major factors associated with poor medication adherence. Of the participants who perceived themselves as being overweight, 86% believed that antipsychotics were responsible. Among those who had such beliefs, 72% had reduced their antipsychotic dosages on their own. About half of the participants had gained more than 7% of their baseline weight and 43.1% of the participants were found to be overweight after one year of treatment with antipsychotics. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that medication adherence is associated with perceived weight status. Healthcare professionals should be aware of this relationship and address this issue early in the management of patients. Apart from weight management programs, education on a correct weight perception should be carried out with the promotion of proper drug attitudes and better insight for the improvement of medication adherence in the early course of psychotic disorder.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171979
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.960
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, MMCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLui, SSYen_US
dc.contributor.authorTso, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:19:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:19:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Schizophrenia And Related Psychoses, 2011, v. 5 n. 3, p. 135-141en_US
dc.identifier.issn1935-1232en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171979-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Medication adherence is critical to the management of psychotic disorder. Different factors associated with medication adherence have been investigated in previous studies. However, the association with subjective weight perception, which is related to the weight gain side effect of antipsychotics, has not been thoroughly investigated. Subjective weight perception may not equal objective weight status. This study tests the hypothesis that medication adherence is related to subjective weight perception in a group of patients with first-episode psychotic disorder who have taken antipsychotics for one year. Methods: This study recruited 160 participants with one-year histories of first-episode psychotic disorder and measured their actual and perceived weights, amount of weight gain in the past year, body size satisfaction and medication adherence levels. The associations between medication adherence and both the actual and perceived weight status were analyzed controlling for other confounding factors including insight, drug attitude, illness severity and other medication side effects. Results: Stepwise multiple regression analysis found that the participants' perceived weight status, negative attitude toward their drugs and insight were the major factors associated with poor medication adherence. Of the participants who perceived themselves as being overweight, 86% believed that antipsychotics were responsible. Among those who had such beliefs, 72% had reduced their antipsychotic dosages on their own. About half of the participants had gained more than 7% of their baseline weight and 43.1% of the participants were found to be overweight after one year of treatment with antipsychotics. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that medication adherence is associated with perceived weight status. Healthcare professionals should be aware of this relationship and address this issue early in the management of patients. Apart from weight management programs, education on a correct weight perception should be carried out with the promotion of proper drug attitudes and better insight for the improvement of medication adherence in the early course of psychotic disorder.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Schizophrenia and Related Psychosesen_US
dc.subjectAdherenceen_US
dc.subjectAntipsychoticsen_US
dc.subjectFirst-Episode Psychotic Disorderen_US
dc.subjectWeight Dissatisfactionen_US
dc.subjectWeight Perceptionen_US
dc.titleMedication adherence and subjective weight perception in patients with first-episode psychotic disorderen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH:eyhchen@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3371/CSRP.5.3.3en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84856367271en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84856367271&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume5en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage135en_US
dc.identifier.epage141en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, MMC=35191127600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, EYH=7402315729en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLui, SSY=35292835200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTso, S=25229476600en_US

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