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Article: Disordered eating in three communities of China: A comparative study of female high school students in Hong Kong, Shenzhen, and rural Hunan

TitleDisordered eating in three communities of China: A comparative study of female high school students in Hong Kong, Shenzhen, and rural Hunan
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/34698
Citation
International Journal Of Eating Disorders, 2000, v. 27 n. 3, p. 317-327 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To examine disordered eating and its psychological correlates among female high school students in three Chinese communities that lay on a gradient of socioeconomic development in China. Method: 796 Chinese students from Hong Kong, Shenzhen, and rural Hunan completed a demographic and weight data sheet, the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), a Body Dissatisfaction Scale (BDS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). Results: Compared to students in Hunan and to a lesser extent students in Shenzhen, students from Hong Kong were slimmer, but desired a lower body mass index (BMI), reported more body dissatisfaction, exhibited a more typical EAT-26 factor structure, scored higher on the 'fat concern and dieting' factor, and constituted more EAT-26 high scorers. Multiple regression analyses indicated that BDS was the most significant predictor of fat concern at each site, but this effect was strongest in Hong Kong. Hunan students had significantly higher BDI scores but lower fat concern than Shenzhen and Hong Kong students. Discussion: The consistent gradient of fat concern across the three communities gives credence to the view that societal modernization fosters disordered eating in women, possibly via the gendered social constraints that accompany it. It is also expressive of the marked socioeconomic heterogeneity within China nowadays. The predictable rising rate of eating disorders that follows global change will pose a growing public health challenge to Asian countries. (C) 2000 by John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171917
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.068
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.930
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, AMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:18:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:18:24Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Eating Disorders, 2000, v. 27 n. 3, p. 317-327en_US
dc.identifier.issn0276-3478en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171917-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine disordered eating and its psychological correlates among female high school students in three Chinese communities that lay on a gradient of socioeconomic development in China. Method: 796 Chinese students from Hong Kong, Shenzhen, and rural Hunan completed a demographic and weight data sheet, the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), a Body Dissatisfaction Scale (BDS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). Results: Compared to students in Hunan and to a lesser extent students in Shenzhen, students from Hong Kong were slimmer, but desired a lower body mass index (BMI), reported more body dissatisfaction, exhibited a more typical EAT-26 factor structure, scored higher on the 'fat concern and dieting' factor, and constituted more EAT-26 high scorers. Multiple regression analyses indicated that BDS was the most significant predictor of fat concern at each site, but this effect was strongest in Hong Kong. Hunan students had significantly higher BDI scores but lower fat concern than Shenzhen and Hong Kong students. Discussion: The consistent gradient of fat concern across the three communities gives credence to the view that societal modernization fosters disordered eating in women, possibly via the gendered social constraints that accompany it. It is also expressive of the marked socioeconomic heterogeneity within China nowadays. The predictable rising rate of eating disorders that follows global change will pose a growing public health challenge to Asian countries. (C) 2000 by John Wiley and Sons, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/34698en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Eating Disordersen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshBody Imageen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEating Disorders - Diagnosis - Epidemiology - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshRural Population - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Concepten_US
dc.subject.meshSomatoform Disorders - Psychologyen_US
dc.titleDisordered eating in three communities of China: A comparative study of female high school students in Hong Kong, Shenzhen, and rural Hunanen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, AM:amlee@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, AM=rp00483en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/(SICI)1098-108X(200004)27:3<317::AID-EAT9>3.0.CO;2-2en_US
dc.identifier.pmid10694718-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0342879908en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros242562-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0342879908&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume27en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage317en_US
dc.identifier.epage327en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSing, L=36895702200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, AM=7405629831en_US

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