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Article: Neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase expressions and activities in the hippocampi and cortices of young adult, aged cognitively unimpaired, and impaired Long-Evans rats

TitleNeuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase expressions and activities in the hippocampi and cortices of young adult, aged cognitively unimpaired, and impaired Long-Evans rats
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/neuroscience
Citation
Neuroscience, 2002, v. 112 n. 2, p. 267-275 How to Cite?
AbstractNitric oxide (NO) is a neurosignaling molecule that appears to play a significant role in learning and memory. This molecule has also been implicated in neurotoxicity due to its oxidative properties. Previous experiments from our laboratories have demonstrated elevated hippocampal and cortical neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) mRNA levels in aged cognitively unimpaired and impaired Long-Evans rats, which could represent either increased neuronal NOS activity thereby leading to NO-mediated neurotoxicity, or a compensatory response by aged neurones to maintain physiological nitric oxide output. The current study measured the protein expression and activity levels of neuronal and inducible NOS in young adult (6 months) and aged (24-26 months) Long-Evans rats by means of western blotting and NOS activity assay. Aged animals were assigned as either cognitively unimpaired or aged with moderate cognitive impairments based on their performances in the Morris water maze behavioural task. Our results showed that hippocampal and cortical neuronal NOS expressions were significantly decreased in aged animals. These aged animals also exhibited increased hippocampal and cortical inducible NOS expressions. Between the two aged animal groups, cognitively impaired rats showed significantly lower hippocampal and cortical neuronal but higher hippocampal inducible NOS expressions. Young adult rats exhibited significantly higher hippocampal and cortical NOS activities than the aged animals. Aged animals with cognitive deficits showed significantly lower hippocampal NOS activity than cognitively unimpaired aged rats. Our data indicate that aging is associated with a decline in neuronal but elevated inducible NOS functioning in brain areas involved in learning and memory. These phenomena could contribute to the cognitive deficits observed in a sub-population of aged animals. © 2002 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171914
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.231
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.768
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLaw, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorO'donnell, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorGauthier, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorQuirion, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:18:23Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:18:23Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationNeuroscience, 2002, v. 112 n. 2, p. 267-275en_US
dc.identifier.issn0306-4522en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171914-
dc.description.abstractNitric oxide (NO) is a neurosignaling molecule that appears to play a significant role in learning and memory. This molecule has also been implicated in neurotoxicity due to its oxidative properties. Previous experiments from our laboratories have demonstrated elevated hippocampal and cortical neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) mRNA levels in aged cognitively unimpaired and impaired Long-Evans rats, which could represent either increased neuronal NOS activity thereby leading to NO-mediated neurotoxicity, or a compensatory response by aged neurones to maintain physiological nitric oxide output. The current study measured the protein expression and activity levels of neuronal and inducible NOS in young adult (6 months) and aged (24-26 months) Long-Evans rats by means of western blotting and NOS activity assay. Aged animals were assigned as either cognitively unimpaired or aged with moderate cognitive impairments based on their performances in the Morris water maze behavioural task. Our results showed that hippocampal and cortical neuronal NOS expressions were significantly decreased in aged animals. These aged animals also exhibited increased hippocampal and cortical inducible NOS expressions. Between the two aged animal groups, cognitively impaired rats showed significantly lower hippocampal and cortical neuronal but higher hippocampal inducible NOS expressions. Young adult rats exhibited significantly higher hippocampal and cortical NOS activities than the aged animals. Aged animals with cognitive deficits showed significantly lower hippocampal NOS activity than cognitively unimpaired aged rats. Our data indicate that aging is associated with a decline in neuronal but elevated inducible NOS functioning in brain areas involved in learning and memory. These phenomena could contribute to the cognitive deficits observed in a sub-population of aged animals. © 2002 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/neuroscienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroscienceen_US
dc.subject.meshAging - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBehavior, Animalen_US
dc.subject.meshCerebral Cortex - Enzymologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCognition Disorders - Enzymologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEnzyme Activationen_US
dc.subject.meshHippocampus - Enzymologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMaze Learningen_US
dc.subject.meshNitric Oxide Synthase - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshNitric Oxide Synthase Type Ien_US
dc.subject.meshNitric Oxide Synthase Type Iien_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshRats, Long-Evansen_US
dc.subject.meshReaction Timeen_US
dc.titleNeuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase expressions and activities in the hippocampi and cortices of young adult, aged cognitively unimpaired, and impaired Long-Evans ratsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLaw, A:acklaw@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, A=rp00262en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0306-4522(02)00082-9en_US
dc.identifier.pmid12044445-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037129914en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037129914&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume112en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage267en_US
dc.identifier.epage275en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000176525700003-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, A=26323772800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridO'Donnell, J=36917668600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGauthier, S=7102604782en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQuirion, R=7202416940en_US

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