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Article: Body dissatisfaction among Chinese undergraduates and its implications for eating disorders in Hong Kong

TitleBody dissatisfaction among Chinese undergraduates and its implications for eating disorders in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date1996
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/34698
Citation
International Journal Of Eating Disorders, 1996, v. 20 n. 1, p. 77-84 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To study the body dissatisfaction of Chinese undergraduates and its implications for eating disorders in Hong Kong. Method: A large sample of 1,581 subjects completed a 'Body Dissatisfaction Questionnaire' (BDQ) which included 25 items about various body parts and questions on body indices, body shape dissatisfaction, and dieting. Results: Whereas male subjects wanted to be taller and stronger in their upper body, the majority of female subjects felt fat in their lower body and were cognitively inclined to weigh less even though they were not obese. They desired a slimming of the stomach, thighs, waist and hip, but not the breasts. Body dissatisfaction was substantially intensified in females who reported a history of dieting in the previous year. Factor analysis of the BDQ affirmed the gender specificity and multidimensionality of body dissatisfaction. Discussion: The typically 'Western' pattern of body dissatisfaction has overshadowed the traditional Chinese notions of female beauty based on the face and other nontruncal features. In the context of a rapidly urbanizing Chinese society, this will predispose more females to weight control behavior and eating disorders.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171888
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.068
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.930
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, AMen_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:18:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:18:13Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Eating Disorders, 1996, v. 20 n. 1, p. 77-84en_US
dc.identifier.issn0276-3478en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171888-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To study the body dissatisfaction of Chinese undergraduates and its implications for eating disorders in Hong Kong. Method: A large sample of 1,581 subjects completed a 'Body Dissatisfaction Questionnaire' (BDQ) which included 25 items about various body parts and questions on body indices, body shape dissatisfaction, and dieting. Results: Whereas male subjects wanted to be taller and stronger in their upper body, the majority of female subjects felt fat in their lower body and were cognitively inclined to weigh less even though they were not obese. They desired a slimming of the stomach, thighs, waist and hip, but not the breasts. Body dissatisfaction was substantially intensified in females who reported a history of dieting in the previous year. Factor analysis of the BDQ affirmed the gender specificity and multidimensionality of body dissatisfaction. Discussion: The typically 'Western' pattern of body dissatisfaction has overshadowed the traditional Chinese notions of female beauty based on the face and other nontruncal features. In the context of a rapidly urbanizing Chinese society, this will predispose more females to weight control behavior and eating disorders.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/34698en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Eating Disordersen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBody Imageen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Cultural Comparisonen_US
dc.subject.meshDiet, Reducing - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEating Disorders - Diagnosis - Ethnology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEthnic Groups - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGender Identityen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonality Inventoryen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Valuesen_US
dc.subject.meshStudents - Psychologyen_US
dc.titleBody dissatisfaction among Chinese undergraduates and its implications for eating disorders in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, AM:amlee@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, AM=rp00483en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/(SICI)1098-108X(199607)20:1<77::AID-EAT9>3.0.CO;2-1en_US
dc.identifier.pmid8807355-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029947836en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros242558-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0029947836&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume20en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage77en_US
dc.identifier.epage84en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1996UU43600009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, S=8695933800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, T=15739768600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, AM=7405629831en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, H=55196233600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, CM=7402612698en_US

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