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Article: Schizophrenia - A brain disease? A critical review of structural and functional cerebral abnormality in the disorder

TitleSchizophrenia - A brain disease? A critical review of structural and functional cerebral abnormality in the disorder
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherRoyal College of Psychiatrists. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjp.rcpsych.org/
Citation
British Journal Of Psychiatry, 1995, v. 166 MAY, p. 563-582 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. With genetic and neurochemical findings pointing to a biological aetiology, considerable effort has been devoted to finding direct evidence of brain abnormality in schizophrenia. Method. CT, MRI, post-mortem and functional imaging studies are reviewed to assess which structural and/or functional brain abnormalities have been consistently demonstrated. Results. The only well-established structural abnormality in schizophrenia is lateral ventricular enlargement; this is modest and there is a large overlap with the normal population. There is no consensus on the presence of any localised structural abnormality from MRI and postmortem studies, but the most promising findings concern temporal robe limbic structures. Hypofrontality is not a well-replicated finding in schizophrenia under resting conditions, but the evidence is stronger for a selective association with negative symptoms. A number of studies have found hypofrontality under conditions of neuropsychological task activation. However, findings in these studies are divided and a recent methodologically sophisticated study has failed to confirm it, although this study suggested a decoupling of prefrontal and temporal function. Conclusion. Schizophrenia is characterised by minor structural abnormality which, in the case of lateral ventricular enlargement, may be better understood as a risk factor than a causative lesion. The functional imaging findings are not transparent but suggest that, as a disorder, schizophrenia shows complex alterations in regional patterns of activity rather than any simple deficit in prefrontal function.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171885
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.06
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.674
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChua, SEen_US
dc.contributor.authorMckenna, PJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:18:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:18:11Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Psychiatry, 1995, v. 166 MAY, p. 563-582en_US
dc.identifier.issn0007-1250en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171885-
dc.description.abstractBackground. With genetic and neurochemical findings pointing to a biological aetiology, considerable effort has been devoted to finding direct evidence of brain abnormality in schizophrenia. Method. CT, MRI, post-mortem and functional imaging studies are reviewed to assess which structural and/or functional brain abnormalities have been consistently demonstrated. Results. The only well-established structural abnormality in schizophrenia is lateral ventricular enlargement; this is modest and there is a large overlap with the normal population. There is no consensus on the presence of any localised structural abnormality from MRI and postmortem studies, but the most promising findings concern temporal robe limbic structures. Hypofrontality is not a well-replicated finding in schizophrenia under resting conditions, but the evidence is stronger for a selective association with negative symptoms. A number of studies have found hypofrontality under conditions of neuropsychological task activation. However, findings in these studies are divided and a recent methodologically sophisticated study has failed to confirm it, although this study suggested a decoupling of prefrontal and temporal function. Conclusion. Schizophrenia is characterised by minor structural abnormality which, in the case of lateral ventricular enlargement, may be better understood as a risk factor than a causative lesion. The functional imaging findings are not transparent but suggest that, as a disorder, schizophrenia shows complex alterations in regional patterns of activity rather than any simple deficit in prefrontal function.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoyal College of Psychiatrists. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjp.rcpsych.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Psychiatryen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Pathology - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Damage, Chronic - Diagnosis - Physiopathology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Mappingen_US
dc.subject.meshDelirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders - Diagnosis - Physiopathology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDiagnostic Imagingen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scalesen_US
dc.subject.meshReproducibility Of Resultsen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - Diagnosis - Pathology - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenic Psychologyen_US
dc.titleSchizophrenia - A brain disease? A critical review of structural and functional cerebral abnormality in the disorderen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChua, SE:sechua@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChua, SE=rp00438en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1192/bjp.166.5.563-
dc.identifier.pmid7620741-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028998370en_US
dc.identifier.volume166en_US
dc.identifier.issueMAYen_US
dc.identifier.spage563en_US
dc.identifier.epage582en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995QY33200003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChua, SE=7201550427en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcKenna, PJ=7201921663en_US

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