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Article: The ethics of my counterpart: Public service ethics in Chinese philosophy

TitleThe ethics of my counterpart: Public service ethics in Chinese philosophy
Authors
KeywordsAdministration
China
Governance
Philosophy
Issue Date2011
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17449626.asp
Citation
Journal Of Global Ethics, 2011, v. 7 n. 3, p. 361-373 How to Cite?
AbstractChina is rising. As China ascends in power, it is likely that Western administrators - American and European, in particular - will find that they must interact with Chinese administrators more and more. In this article, I offer readers a brief glimpse into Chinese administrative ethics through an investigation of two forms of Chinese philosophy - Confucianism and Taoism. In addition to reviewing these philosophies, I derive some consequences for a public service ethic that lies between the East and the West. In particular, this article includes some recommendations for the managerial implications of these two philosophies in the context of increased political and administrative connections between the West and China. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171864
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.284
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJordan, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:17:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:17:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Global Ethics, 2011, v. 7 n. 3, p. 361-373en_US
dc.identifier.issn1744-9626en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171864-
dc.description.abstractChina is rising. As China ascends in power, it is likely that Western administrators - American and European, in particular - will find that they must interact with Chinese administrators more and more. In this article, I offer readers a brief glimpse into Chinese administrative ethics through an investigation of two forms of Chinese philosophy - Confucianism and Taoism. In addition to reviewing these philosophies, I derive some consequences for a public service ethic that lies between the East and the West. In particular, this article includes some recommendations for the managerial implications of these two philosophies in the context of increased political and administrative connections between the West and China. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17449626.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Global Ethicsen_US
dc.subjectAdministrationen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectGovernanceen_US
dc.subjectPhilosophyen_US
dc.titleThe ethics of my counterpart: Public service ethics in Chinese philosophyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailJordan, S:sjordan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityJordan, S=rp00551en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17449626.2011.635685en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84857814195en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros206985-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84857814195&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume7en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage361en_US
dc.identifier.epage373en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJordan, S=23479888000en_US

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