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Article: When is a cause just?

TitleWhen is a cause just?
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=RIS
Citation
Review Of International Studies, 2002, v. 28 n. 3, p. 557-575 How to Cite?
AbstractThe September 11 terrorist strikes prompted renewed interest in a debate about just cause that has been increasingly open since the demise of the Cold War and the shift to a more multilateral and interventionist world order. This article contributes to that debate by looking first into the just war tradition to argue for a conceptual revision that equates just cause with jus ad bellum (just recourse to war). It then seeks to specify the component parts of just cause understood in this way, holding that demonstrable injustice should take the place formerly occupied by just cause in just war theory. Towards the end it uses three real-world cases to develop a mechanism for validating just cause claims. The argument is that a cause is just only when its proponents can convince an international forum of intractable injustice, responsible intervention, and an appropriate balance of contingent factors. The article closes by considering how the current war on terrorism might be assessed in such a forum.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171820
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.309
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.140

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHolliday, Ien_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:17:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:17:42Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationReview Of International Studies, 2002, v. 28 n. 3, p. 557-575en_US
dc.identifier.issn0260-2105en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171820-
dc.description.abstractThe September 11 terrorist strikes prompted renewed interest in a debate about just cause that has been increasingly open since the demise of the Cold War and the shift to a more multilateral and interventionist world order. This article contributes to that debate by looking first into the just war tradition to argue for a conceptual revision that equates just cause with jus ad bellum (just recourse to war). It then seeks to specify the component parts of just cause understood in this way, holding that demonstrable injustice should take the place formerly occupied by just cause in just war theory. Towards the end it uses three real-world cases to develop a mechanism for validating just cause claims. The argument is that a cause is just only when its proponents can convince an international forum of intractable injustice, responsible intervention, and an appropriate balance of contingent factors. The article closes by considering how the current war on terrorism might be assessed in such a forum.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=RISen_US
dc.relation.ispartofReview of International Studiesen_US
dc.titleWhen is a cause just?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHolliday, I:ian.holliday@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHolliday, I=rp00067en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0260210502005570en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036334346en_US
dc.identifier.volume28en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage557en_US
dc.identifier.epage575en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHolliday, I=7003868118en_US

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