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Article: From empire defence to imperial retreat: Britain's postwar China policy and the decolonization of Hong Kong

TitleFrom empire defence to imperial retreat: Britain's postwar China policy and the decolonization of Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date1994
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=ASS
Citation
Modern Asian Studies, 1994, v. 28 n. 2, p. 317-337 How to Cite?
AbstractHong Kong has existed as a British crown colony since 1942, and its colonial political structures remained more or less the same until the early 1980s. Hong Kong's special relations with China are an important factor making it an oddity in post-war British decolonization. Instead of becoming independent like most other British colonial territories, Hong Kong's political future is linked to China. This situation of "decolonization without independence' has been an important theme of academic analysis on the colony's political development. Instead of searching for a common denominator and building the pattern of postwar British decolonization, this paper is an attempt to explain Britain's attitude towards Hong Kong by placing it in the context of the evolution of British foreign policy in the postwar world in general, and its attitude towards the rise of Chinese communism in particular. -from Author
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171801
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.405
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.332

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, JTHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:17:38Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:17:38Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationModern Asian Studies, 1994, v. 28 n. 2, p. 317-337en_US
dc.identifier.issn0026-749Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171801-
dc.description.abstractHong Kong has existed as a British crown colony since 1942, and its colonial political structures remained more or less the same until the early 1980s. Hong Kong's special relations with China are an important factor making it an oddity in post-war British decolonization. Instead of becoming independent like most other British colonial territories, Hong Kong's political future is linked to China. This situation of "decolonization without independence' has been an important theme of academic analysis on the colony's political development. Instead of searching for a common denominator and building the pattern of postwar British decolonization, this paper is an attempt to explain Britain's attitude towards Hong Kong by placing it in the context of the evolution of British foreign policy in the postwar world in general, and its attitude towards the rise of Chinese communism in particular. -from Authoren_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=ASSen_US
dc.relation.ispartofModern Asian Studiesen_US
dc.titleFrom empire defence to imperial retreat: Britain's postwar China policy and the decolonization of Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTang, JTH:jthtang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTang, JTH=rp00595en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027970587en_US
dc.identifier.volume28en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage317en_US
dc.identifier.epage337en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, JTH=14065514300en_US

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