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Article: Carotid body function in health and disease

TitleCarotid body function in health and disease
Authors
KeywordsCarotid Body
Chemoreceptors
Pathophysiology
Issue Date2012
Citation
Fudan University Journal Of Medical Sciences, 2012, v. 39 n. 1, p. 5-11 How to Cite?
AbstractPeripheral chemoreceptors in the carotid body play a significant role in the transduction of chemical stimuli in the arterial blood notably hypoxia, hypercapnia and acidosis to the central for eliciting the chemoreflex, which is central to the hypoxic ventilatory response and is also important for the circulatory responses to hypoxia. It is known that interactions between the peripheral and central chemoreceptors are crucial to the magnitude of the reflex response for the ventilatory control. In addition, the carotid chemoreceptor activity contributes to the ventilatory and humoral responses to exercise and also significantly to the ventilatory acclimatization to chronic hypoxia at high altitude. Under diseased conditions, there are augmented chemoreceptor activity and chemoreflex sensitivity in patients with hypertension or sleep-disordered breathing including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and congestive heart failure and also in experimental animal models mimicking these diseases. Thus, the carotid body functions to maintain the oxygen homeostasis; whereas anomalous carotid chemoreceptor activities associated with diseases could be both adaptive and pathogenic in nature, for which cellular and molecular mechanisms have been proposed for the pathophysiogical consequences.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171791
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.105
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFung, MLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:17:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:17:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationFudan University Journal Of Medical Sciences, 2012, v. 39 n. 1, p. 5-11en_US
dc.identifier.issn1672-8467en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171791-
dc.description.abstractPeripheral chemoreceptors in the carotid body play a significant role in the transduction of chemical stimuli in the arterial blood notably hypoxia, hypercapnia and acidosis to the central for eliciting the chemoreflex, which is central to the hypoxic ventilatory response and is also important for the circulatory responses to hypoxia. It is known that interactions between the peripheral and central chemoreceptors are crucial to the magnitude of the reflex response for the ventilatory control. In addition, the carotid chemoreceptor activity contributes to the ventilatory and humoral responses to exercise and also significantly to the ventilatory acclimatization to chronic hypoxia at high altitude. Under diseased conditions, there are augmented chemoreceptor activity and chemoreflex sensitivity in patients with hypertension or sleep-disordered breathing including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and congestive heart failure and also in experimental animal models mimicking these diseases. Thus, the carotid body functions to maintain the oxygen homeostasis; whereas anomalous carotid chemoreceptor activities associated with diseases could be both adaptive and pathogenic in nature, for which cellular and molecular mechanisms have been proposed for the pathophysiogical consequences.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFudan University Journal of Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectCarotid Bodyen_US
dc.subjectChemoreceptorsen_US
dc.subjectPathophysiologyen_US
dc.titleCarotid body function in health and diseaseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailFung, ML:fungml@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityFung, ML=rp00433en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3969/j.issn.1672-8467.2012.01.002en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862262899en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84862262899&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume39en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage5en_US
dc.identifier.epage11en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, ML=7101955092en_US

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