File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Epidemiology and potential associated risk factors of drug-related problems in hospitalised children in the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia

TitleEpidemiology and potential associated risk factors of drug-related problems in hospitalised children in the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia
Authors
KeywordsDrug-Related Problems
Hospitalised Children
Paediatrics
Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe (Pcne)
Risk Factors
Issue Date2012
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00228/index.htm
Citation
European Journal Of Clinical Pharmacology, 2012, v. 68 n. 12, p. 1657-1666 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: Drug-related problems (DRP) are "an event or circumstance involving drug therapy that actually or potentially interferes with the desired health outcome". The extent and characteristics of DRPs in children in the UK and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) are unknown. Our aim was to determine the epidemiology of and identify risk factors for DRPs in hospitalised children. Methods: A prospective cohort study was carried out in children aged 0-18 years, admitted to the medical ward, paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) during a 3-month period in two hospitals. Patients' charts, medical records and laboratory data were reviewed daily to identify DRPs; their preventability and severity were assessed. Logistic regression was used to analyse the potential risk factors associated with DRP incidence. Results: Seven hundred and thirty-seven children (median age 2.3 years, interquartile range 6 months to 8 years, 58.1% male) were included. Three hundred and thirty-three patients suffered from 478 DRPs. Overall DRP incidence was 45.2% (95% CI, 41.5-48.8); KSA (51.1%; 95% CI, 45.8-56.3), UK (39.4%; 95% CI, 34.4-44.6). Incidence was highest in the PICU (59.7%; 95% CI, 47.0-71.5). Dosing problems were the most frequently reported DRPs (n = 258, 54%). 80.3% of DRP (n = 384) cases were preventable; 72.2% (n = 345) of DRPs were assessed as minor; 27% (n = 129) as moderate. Number of prescriptions and type of admission (transferred) were potential risk factors for DRP occurrence in children. Conclusions: Drug-related problems were common in the hospitalised children in this study; the most frequent were dosing problems and drug choice problems; the majority of them were preventable. Polypharmacy and transferred admission (another hospital or ward) were potential risk factors. To improve prescribing practices and minimise the risk of DRPs in hospitalised children, paediatric pharmacology and pharmacotherapy are important in medical education. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171442
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.71
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.096
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRashed, ANen_US
dc.contributor.authorNeubert, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorTomlin, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorJackman, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlhamdan, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlshaikh, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorAttar, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorAseeri, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorWilton, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:14:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:14:15Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Clinical Pharmacology, 2012, v. 68 n. 12, p. 1657-1666en_US
dc.identifier.issn0031-6970en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171442-
dc.description.abstractAim: Drug-related problems (DRP) are "an event or circumstance involving drug therapy that actually or potentially interferes with the desired health outcome". The extent and characteristics of DRPs in children in the UK and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) are unknown. Our aim was to determine the epidemiology of and identify risk factors for DRPs in hospitalised children. Methods: A prospective cohort study was carried out in children aged 0-18 years, admitted to the medical ward, paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) during a 3-month period in two hospitals. Patients' charts, medical records and laboratory data were reviewed daily to identify DRPs; their preventability and severity were assessed. Logistic regression was used to analyse the potential risk factors associated with DRP incidence. Results: Seven hundred and thirty-seven children (median age 2.3 years, interquartile range 6 months to 8 years, 58.1% male) were included. Three hundred and thirty-three patients suffered from 478 DRPs. Overall DRP incidence was 45.2% (95% CI, 41.5-48.8); KSA (51.1%; 95% CI, 45.8-56.3), UK (39.4%; 95% CI, 34.4-44.6). Incidence was highest in the PICU (59.7%; 95% CI, 47.0-71.5). Dosing problems were the most frequently reported DRPs (n = 258, 54%). 80.3% of DRP (n = 384) cases were preventable; 72.2% (n = 345) of DRPs were assessed as minor; 27% (n = 129) as moderate. Number of prescriptions and type of admission (transferred) were potential risk factors for DRP occurrence in children. Conclusions: Drug-related problems were common in the hospitalised children in this study; the most frequent were dosing problems and drug choice problems; the majority of them were preventable. Polypharmacy and transferred admission (another hospital or ward) were potential risk factors. To improve prescribing practices and minimise the risk of DRPs in hospitalised children, paediatric pharmacology and pharmacotherapy are important in medical education. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00228/index.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Clinical Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subjectDrug-Related Problemsen_US
dc.subjectHospitalised Childrenen_US
dc.subjectPaediatricsen_US
dc.subjectPharmaceutical Care Network Europe (Pcne)en_US
dc.subjectRisk Factorsen_US
dc.titleEpidemiology and potential associated risk factors of drug-related problems in hospitalised children in the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK:wongick@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00228-012-1302-xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid22644343-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84871343244en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros207153-
dc.identifier.spage1657en_US
dc.identifier.epage1666en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000310999700010-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRashed, AN=54584268300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNeubert, A=7003774960en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTomlin, S=7003861490en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJackman, J=55226709400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAlhamdan, H=55227359900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAlShaikh, A=36087167000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAttar, A=55227926000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAseeri, M=12752663200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilton, L=7005090722en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike10742878-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats