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Article: Unlicensed use of metformin in children and adolescents in the UK

TitleUnlicensed use of metformin in children and adolescents in the UK
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJCP
Citation
British Journal Of Clinical Pharmacology, 2012, v. 73 n. 1, p. 135-139 How to Cite?
AbstractAIM: Metformin is the most commonly prescribed oral anti-diabetic drug in young people. It is also prescribed for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and obesity treatment in adults in an unlicensed fashion. Little is known as to the extent metformin has been used in young people. We investigated the use of metformin in children and adolescents aged 0-18 years in the UK. METHODS: Population-based prescribing data were obtained from the UK IMS Disease Analyzer between January 2000 and December 2010. RESULTS: A total of 2674 metformin prescriptions were issued to 337 patients (80% female) between 2000 and 2010. The prevalence of metformin prescribing increased from 0.03 per 1000 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02, 0.05] to 0.16 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 0.12, 0.20) (P= 0.001). There was a steady increase in metformin prescribing in girls aged 16-18 years. There were 290 metformin treated patients (81% female; n= 235) who had at least one diagnosis of diabetes, PCOS or obesity. Among these patients, PCOS was the most common indication for metformin prescribing in girls (n= 120) followed by diabetes. There were 22 patients (7.6%) who received metformin for obesity treatment only. CONCLUSIONS: Prescribing of metformin increased between 2000 and 2010, in particular amongst girls aged 16-18 years. The main indication for metformin prescribing was PCOS. At present, metformin is not licensed for PCOS and obesity treatment in adults or children. As there is a steady increase in the prescribing of metformin in young people, further studies are required to investigate the efficacy and safety of these prescriptions. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171437
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.83
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.486
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHsia, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorDawoud, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorSutcliffe, AGen_US
dc.contributor.authorViner, RMen_US
dc.contributor.authorKinra, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:14:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:14:12Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Clinical Pharmacology, 2012, v. 73 n. 1, p. 135-139en_US
dc.identifier.issn0306-5251en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171437-
dc.description.abstractAIM: Metformin is the most commonly prescribed oral anti-diabetic drug in young people. It is also prescribed for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and obesity treatment in adults in an unlicensed fashion. Little is known as to the extent metformin has been used in young people. We investigated the use of metformin in children and adolescents aged 0-18 years in the UK. METHODS: Population-based prescribing data were obtained from the UK IMS Disease Analyzer between January 2000 and December 2010. RESULTS: A total of 2674 metformin prescriptions were issued to 337 patients (80% female) between 2000 and 2010. The prevalence of metformin prescribing increased from 0.03 per 1000 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02, 0.05] to 0.16 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 0.12, 0.20) (P= 0.001). There was a steady increase in metformin prescribing in girls aged 16-18 years. There were 290 metformin treated patients (81% female; n= 235) who had at least one diagnosis of diabetes, PCOS or obesity. Among these patients, PCOS was the most common indication for metformin prescribing in girls (n= 120) followed by diabetes. There were 22 patients (7.6%) who received metformin for obesity treatment only. CONCLUSIONS: Prescribing of metformin increased between 2000 and 2010, in particular amongst girls aged 16-18 years. The main indication for metformin prescribing was PCOS. At present, metformin is not licensed for PCOS and obesity treatment in adults or children. As there is a steady increase in the prescribing of metformin in young people, further studies are required to investigate the efficacy and safety of these prescriptions. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJCPen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Clinical Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus - Drug Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Prescriptions - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Utilization - Legislation & Jurisprudence - Trendsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGreat Britainen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshHypoglycemic Agents - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshLegislation, Drugen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMetformin - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshObesity - Drug Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshOff-Label Useen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysician's Practice Patterns - Statistics & Numerical Data - Trendsen_US
dc.subject.meshPolycystic Ovary Syndrome - Drug Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_US
dc.titleUnlicensed use of metformin in children and adolescents in the UKen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK:wongick@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2125.2011.04063.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid21762204-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3248263-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-83155176037en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros207213-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-83155176037&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume73en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage135en_US
dc.identifier.epage139en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297790200016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHsia, Y=35068032100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDawoud, D=26639217600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSutcliffe, AG=7005644774en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridViner, RM=7005899067en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKinra, S=6603836017en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_US
dc.customcontrol.immutablecsl 130312-

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