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Article: The incidence and nature of prescribing and medication administration errors in paediatric inpatients

TitleThe incidence and nature of prescribing and medication administration errors in paediatric inpatients
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archdischild.com/
Citation
Archives Of Disease In Childhood, 2010, v. 95 n. 2, p. 113-118 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To determine the incidence and nature of prescribing and medication administration errors in paediatric inpatients. Design: Prospective review of drug charts to identify prescribing errors and prospective observation of nurses preparing and administering drugs to identify medication administration errors. In addition, incident reports were collected for each ward studied. Participants: Paediatric patients admitted to hospitals and nurses administering medications to these patients. Setting: 11 wards (prescribing errors) and 10 wards (medication administration errors) across five hospitals (one specialist children's teaching hospital, one nonteaching hospital and three teaching hospitals) in the London area (UK). Main outcome measures: Number, types and incidence of prescribing and medication administration errors, using practitioner-based definitions. Results: 391 prescribing errors were identified, giving an overall prescribing error rate of 13.2% of medication orders (95% CI 12.0 to 14.5). There was great variation in prescribing error rates between wards. Incomplete prescriptions were the most common type of prescribing error, and dosing errors the third most common. 429 medication administration errors were identified; giving an overall incidence of 19.1% (95% CI 17.5% to 20.7%) erroneous administrations. Errors in drug preparation were the most common, followed by incorrect rates of intravenous administration. Conclusions: Prescribing and medication administration errors are not uncommon in paediatrics, partly as a result of the extra challenges in prescribing and administering medication to this patient group. The causes and extent of these errors need to be explored locally and improvement strategies pursued.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171396
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.231
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.118
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGhaleb, MAen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarber, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, BDen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:13:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:13:53Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Disease In Childhood, 2010, v. 95 n. 2, p. 113-118en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-9888en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171396-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To determine the incidence and nature of prescribing and medication administration errors in paediatric inpatients. Design: Prospective review of drug charts to identify prescribing errors and prospective observation of nurses preparing and administering drugs to identify medication administration errors. In addition, incident reports were collected for each ward studied. Participants: Paediatric patients admitted to hospitals and nurses administering medications to these patients. Setting: 11 wards (prescribing errors) and 10 wards (medication administration errors) across five hospitals (one specialist children's teaching hospital, one nonteaching hospital and three teaching hospitals) in the London area (UK). Main outcome measures: Number, types and incidence of prescribing and medication administration errors, using practitioner-based definitions. Results: 391 prescribing errors were identified, giving an overall prescribing error rate of 13.2% of medication orders (95% CI 12.0 to 14.5). There was great variation in prescribing error rates between wards. Incomplete prescriptions were the most common type of prescribing error, and dosing errors the third most common. 429 medication administration errors were identified; giving an overall incidence of 19.1% (95% CI 17.5% to 20.7%) erroneous administrations. Errors in drug preparation were the most common, followed by incorrect rates of intravenous administration. Conclusions: Prescribing and medication administration errors are not uncommon in paediatrics, partly as a result of the extra challenges in prescribing and administering medication to this patient group. The causes and extent of these errors need to be explored locally and improvement strategies pursued.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archdischild.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Disease in Childhooden_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Prescriptions - Standards - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshHospitalization - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_US
dc.subject.meshLondon - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMedication Errors - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshPharmaceutical Preparations - Administration & Dosageen_US
dc.subject.meshPharmacy Service, Hospital - Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_US
dc.titleThe incidence and nature of prescribing and medication administration errors in paediatric inpatientsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK:wongick@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/adc.2009.158485en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20133327-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77149138787en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77149138787&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume95en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage113en_US
dc.identifier.epage118en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1468-2044-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000274644000007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGhaleb, MA=8903103000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarber, N=7005001200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFranklin, BD=16416542300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike8838771-

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