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Article: Red wine polyphenols prevent acceleration of neovascularization by angiotensin II in the ischemic rat hindlimb

TitleRed wine polyphenols prevent acceleration of neovascularization by angiotensin II in the ischemic rat hindlimb
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherAmerican Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. The Journal's web site is located at http://jpet.aspetjournals.org
Citation
Journal Of Pharmacology And Experimental Therapeutics, 2009, v. 329 n. 2, p. 699-707 How to Cite?
AbstractStudies in both animals and humans indicate that angiogenesis is implicated in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Thus, inhibition of angiogenesis may provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of atherosclerosis. Because epidemiological studies have indicated an inverse relation between red wine intake and coronary disease, we determined the antiangiogenic potential of red wine polyphenols (RWPs) in the ischemic hindlimb model. Neovascularization was accelerated by the chronic infusion of angiotensin II (Ang II; 0.1 mg/ kg/day). RWPs (25 mg/kg/day) or vehicle were administrated in the drinking water 7 days before the ligation. After 21 days, Ang II potentiated the ischemia-induced neovascularization in the hindlimb, as assessed by microangiography and measurement of microvessel density. This effect was associated with an increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α, endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). RWPs intake significantly prevented the angiogenic process, the formation of ROS and nitrated proteins, and the expression HIF-2α, eNOS, and VEGF induced by Ang II. Similar preventive effects were observed with the antioxidant and NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. These findings indicate that RWPs have potent antiangiogenic properties in vivo by preventing the expression of proangiogenic factors, including VEGF and eNOS most likely by inhibiting oxidative stress. Thus, the antiangiogenic properties of red wine polyphenols might contribute to their protective effect against coronary disease. Copyright © 2009 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171379
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.76
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.847
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWalter, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorEtienneSelloum, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrasse, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorSchleiffer, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorBekaert, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorVanhoutte, PMen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeretz, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchiniKerth, VBen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:13:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:13:44Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Pharmacology And Experimental Therapeutics, 2009, v. 329 n. 2, p. 699-707en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-3565en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171379-
dc.description.abstractStudies in both animals and humans indicate that angiogenesis is implicated in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Thus, inhibition of angiogenesis may provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of atherosclerosis. Because epidemiological studies have indicated an inverse relation between red wine intake and coronary disease, we determined the antiangiogenic potential of red wine polyphenols (RWPs) in the ischemic hindlimb model. Neovascularization was accelerated by the chronic infusion of angiotensin II (Ang II; 0.1 mg/ kg/day). RWPs (25 mg/kg/day) or vehicle were administrated in the drinking water 7 days before the ligation. After 21 days, Ang II potentiated the ischemia-induced neovascularization in the hindlimb, as assessed by microangiography and measurement of microvessel density. This effect was associated with an increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α, endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). RWPs intake significantly prevented the angiogenic process, the formation of ROS and nitrated proteins, and the expression HIF-2α, eNOS, and VEGF induced by Ang II. Similar preventive effects were observed with the antioxidant and NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. These findings indicate that RWPs have potent antiangiogenic properties in vivo by preventing the expression of proangiogenic factors, including VEGF and eNOS most likely by inhibiting oxidative stress. Thus, the antiangiogenic properties of red wine polyphenols might contribute to their protective effect against coronary disease. Copyright © 2009 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. The Journal's web site is located at http://jpet.aspetjournals.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeuticsen_US
dc.subject.meshAngiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshAngiotensin Ii - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBlotting, Westernen_US
dc.subject.meshDisease Models, Animalen_US
dc.subject.meshFlavonoids - Isolation & Purification - Pharmacology - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshHindlimb - Blood Supplyen_US
dc.subject.meshIschemia - Complications - Metabolism - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshNeovascularization, Pathologic - Chemically Induced - Metabolism - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshNitric Oxide Synthase Type Iii - Biosynthesisen_US
dc.subject.meshPhenols - Isolation & Purification - Pharmacology - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshPolyphenolsen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshRats, Wistaren_US
dc.subject.meshVascular Endothelial Growth Factor A - Biosynthesisen_US
dc.subject.meshWineen_US
dc.titleRed wine polyphenols prevent acceleration of neovascularization by angiotensin II in the ischemic rat hindlimben_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailVanhoutte, PM:vanhoutt@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityVanhoutte, PM=rp00238en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1124/jpet.108.148080en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19193929-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-65649119623en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros165630-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-65649119623&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume329en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage699en_US
dc.identifier.epage707en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000265444000033-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWalter, A=24729659600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEtienneSelloum, N=17134933800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrasse, D=6701464512en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchleiffer, R=7006557077en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBekaert, V=17345331500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVanhoutte, PM=7202304247en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBeretz, A=7003749803en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchiniKerth, VB=7003640666en_US

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