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Article: Endothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factors

TitleEndothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factors
Authors
Issue Date1989
PublisherFederation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.fasebj.org/
Citation
Faseb Journal, 1989, v. 3 n. 9, p. 2007-2018 How to Cite?
AbstractEndothelium-dependent relaxation of blood vessels is produced by a large number of agents (e.g., acetylcholine, ATP and ADP, substance P, bradykinin, histamine, thrombin, serotonin). With some agents, relaxation may be limited to certain species and/or blood vessels. Relaxation results from release of a very labile non-prostanoid endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) or factors. EDRF stimulates guanylate cyclase of the vascular smooth muscle, with the resulting increase in cyclic GMP activating relaxation. EDRF is rapidly inactivated by hemoglobin and superoxide. There is strong evidence that EDRF from many blood vessels and from cultured endothelial cells is nitric oxide (NO) and that its precursor is L-arginine. There is evidence for other relaxing factors, including an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor in some vessels. Flow-induced shear stress also stimulates EDRF release. Endothelium-dependent relaxation occurs in resistance vessels as well as in larger arteries, and is generally more pronounced in arteries than veins. EDRF also inhibits platelet aggregation and adhesion to the blood vessel wall. Endothelium-derived contracting factors appear to be responsible for endothelium-dependent contractions produced by arachidonic acid and hypoxia in isolated systemic vessels and by certain agents and by rapid stretch in isolated cerebral vessels. In all such experiments, the endothelium-derived contracting factor appears to be some product or by-product of cyclooxygenase activity. Recently, endothelial cells in culture have been found to synthesize a peptide, endothelin, which is an extremely potent vasoconstrictor. The possible physiological roles and pathophysiological significance of endothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factors are briefly discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170927
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.299
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.775
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFurchgott, RFen_US
dc.contributor.authorVanhoutte, PMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:11:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:11:28Z-
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.identifier.citationFaseb Journal, 1989, v. 3 n. 9, p. 2007-2018en_US
dc.identifier.issn0892-6638en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170927-
dc.description.abstractEndothelium-dependent relaxation of blood vessels is produced by a large number of agents (e.g., acetylcholine, ATP and ADP, substance P, bradykinin, histamine, thrombin, serotonin). With some agents, relaxation may be limited to certain species and/or blood vessels. Relaxation results from release of a very labile non-prostanoid endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) or factors. EDRF stimulates guanylate cyclase of the vascular smooth muscle, with the resulting increase in cyclic GMP activating relaxation. EDRF is rapidly inactivated by hemoglobin and superoxide. There is strong evidence that EDRF from many blood vessels and from cultured endothelial cells is nitric oxide (NO) and that its precursor is L-arginine. There is evidence for other relaxing factors, including an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor in some vessels. Flow-induced shear stress also stimulates EDRF release. Endothelium-dependent relaxation occurs in resistance vessels as well as in larger arteries, and is generally more pronounced in arteries than veins. EDRF also inhibits platelet aggregation and adhesion to the blood vessel wall. Endothelium-derived contracting factors appear to be responsible for endothelium-dependent contractions produced by arachidonic acid and hypoxia in isolated systemic vessels and by certain agents and by rapid stretch in isolated cerebral vessels. In all such experiments, the endothelium-derived contracting factor appears to be some product or by-product of cyclooxygenase activity. Recently, endothelial cells in culture have been found to synthesize a peptide, endothelin, which is an extremely potent vasoconstrictor. The possible physiological roles and pathophysiological significance of endothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factors are briefly discussed.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherFederation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.fasebj.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofFASEB Journalen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCyclic Gmp - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEndothelinsen_US
dc.subject.meshEndothelium - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNitric Oxide - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPeptides - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshVasoconstrictor Agentsen_US
dc.subject.meshVasodilator Agentsen_US
dc.subject.meshVasomotor System - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleEndothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailVanhoutte, PM:vanhoutt@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityVanhoutte, PM=rp00238en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid2545495-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0024390169en_US
dc.identifier.volume3en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage2007en_US
dc.identifier.epage2018en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1989AE80500002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFurchgott, RF=7004563242en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVanhoutte, PM=7202304247en_US

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