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Article: Lysophosphatidylcholine causes cardiac arrhythmia

TitleLysophosphatidylcholine causes cardiac arrhythmia
Authors
Issue Date1982
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yjmcc
Citation
Journal Of Molecular And Cellular Cardiology, 1982, v. 14 n. 3, p. 173-175 How to Cite?
AbstractThe precipitation of malignant cardiac arrhythmias after onset of ischemia is well-documented [7]. Although many biochemical and physiological changes were observed during ischemia, the exact cause for disturbances in cardiac rhythm after ischemia remains obscure. Recently, several investigators reported that lysophosphoglycerides were accumulated in the ischemic myocardium [3, 11, 12] of several mammalian species. These lysophosphoglycerides are thought to originate from hydrolytic deacylation of phospholipids [4]. Since lysophosphoglycerides are cytolytic, [13] the accumulation of these lipids in myocardium may be important in the genesis of arrhythmias associated with ischemia. Depression of action potential in isolated cardiac fibers by lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) further suggests the arrythmogenic nature of these lipids [4]. More recent work showed that LPC and acyl carnitine, another amphiphilic compound, had similar electrophysiological effects on canine Purkinje fibers [5] and the effect might be dependent on a critical micelle concentration [1]. In this communication, we provide direct evidence that perfusion of hamster hearts with a solution containing LPC, the major lysophosphoglyceride in mammalian hearts, causes cardiac arrhythmias as a function of the quantity present in the free form. Exclusively bound lysophosphatidylcholine, associated with serum proteins, is not arrhythmogenic, as has been noted by others [5]. The results indicate also that low concentrations of free lysophosphatidylcholine, simulating those found in ischemic hearts, are arrhythmogenic.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170667
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.874
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.522
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMan, RYKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChoy, PCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:10:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:10:20Z-
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Molecular And Cellular Cardiology, 1982, v. 14 n. 3, p. 173-175en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-2828en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170667-
dc.description.abstractThe precipitation of malignant cardiac arrhythmias after onset of ischemia is well-documented [7]. Although many biochemical and physiological changes were observed during ischemia, the exact cause for disturbances in cardiac rhythm after ischemia remains obscure. Recently, several investigators reported that lysophosphoglycerides were accumulated in the ischemic myocardium [3, 11, 12] of several mammalian species. These lysophosphoglycerides are thought to originate from hydrolytic deacylation of phospholipids [4]. Since lysophosphoglycerides are cytolytic, [13] the accumulation of these lipids in myocardium may be important in the genesis of arrhythmias associated with ischemia. Depression of action potential in isolated cardiac fibers by lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) further suggests the arrythmogenic nature of these lipids [4]. More recent work showed that LPC and acyl carnitine, another amphiphilic compound, had similar electrophysiological effects on canine Purkinje fibers [5] and the effect might be dependent on a critical micelle concentration [1]. In this communication, we provide direct evidence that perfusion of hamster hearts with a solution containing LPC, the major lysophosphoglyceride in mammalian hearts, causes cardiac arrhythmias as a function of the quantity present in the free form. Exclusively bound lysophosphatidylcholine, associated with serum proteins, is not arrhythmogenic, as has been noted by others [5]. The results indicate also that low concentrations of free lysophosphatidylcholine, simulating those found in ischemic hearts, are arrhythmogenic.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yjmccen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshArrhythmias, Cardiac - Chemically Induceden_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Proteins - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshCricetinaeen_US
dc.subject.meshLysophosphatidylcholines - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshProtein Bindingen_US
dc.titleLysophosphatidylcholine causes cardiac arrhythmiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMan, RYK:rykman@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMan, RYK=rp00236en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0022-2828(82)90115-8-
dc.identifier.pmid7108972-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0019979513en_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage173en_US
dc.identifier.epage175en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1982NU01900005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMan, RYK=7004986435en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChoy, PC=7006633002en_US

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