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Article: Different behavior of the resistance vessels of the human calf and forearm during contralateral isometric exercise, mental stress, and abnormal respiratory movements

TitleDifferent behavior of the resistance vessels of the human calf and forearm during contralateral isometric exercise, mental stress, and abnormal respiratory movements
Authors
Issue Date1981
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://circres.ahajournals.org
Citation
Circulation Research, 1981, v. 48 n. 6 II, p. I-118-I-130 How to Cite?
AbstractExperiments were conducted in normal human volunteers to compare the response of the forearm and calf vessels to contralateral isometric exercise, mental stress, resisted breathing, coughing, and the Valsalva maneuver. Blood flows were measured by means of strain-gauge plethysmography, arterial blood pressure by auscultation, and heart rate by electrocardiography. Isometric exercise of one forearm (at one-third maximal voluntary contraction) for 90 seconds caused an increase in blood pressure and heart rate; the vascular resistance decreased in the resting forearm, and increased in the calf. The decrease in forearm resistance was greater with the subjects supine and attenuated with the subjects standing or reclining head-down. With arterial occlusion of the exercising forearm just prior to cessation of the handgrip, the blood pressure and the calf resistance remained elevated, while the heart rate returned to control. The forearm resistance increased during the occlusion period and remained elevated throughout it. Mental stress caused an increase in heart rate and blood pressure and a dilation of the forearm but not of the calf vessels; these changes were smaller in standing than in supine subjects. Resisted breathing and coughing caused an increase in heart rate and in forearm blood flow, but not in calf blood flow. The Valsalva maneuver was followed by decreases in blood flow to the upper and lower limbs. The different responses in forearm and calf vessels can be explained by a central component which triggers a vasodilator pathway (possibly cholinergic) which is distributed to forearm but not to calf vessels.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170638
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 11.551
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.755

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRusch, NJen_US
dc.contributor.authorShepherd, JTen_US
dc.contributor.authorWebb, RCen_US
dc.contributor.authorVanhoutte, PMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:10:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:10:15Z-
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.identifier.citationCirculation Research, 1981, v. 48 n. 6 II, p. I-118-I-130en_US
dc.identifier.issn0009-7330en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170638-
dc.description.abstractExperiments were conducted in normal human volunteers to compare the response of the forearm and calf vessels to contralateral isometric exercise, mental stress, resisted breathing, coughing, and the Valsalva maneuver. Blood flows were measured by means of strain-gauge plethysmography, arterial blood pressure by auscultation, and heart rate by electrocardiography. Isometric exercise of one forearm (at one-third maximal voluntary contraction) for 90 seconds caused an increase in blood pressure and heart rate; the vascular resistance decreased in the resting forearm, and increased in the calf. The decrease in forearm resistance was greater with the subjects supine and attenuated with the subjects standing or reclining head-down. With arterial occlusion of the exercising forearm just prior to cessation of the handgrip, the blood pressure and the calf resistance remained elevated, while the heart rate returned to control. The forearm resistance increased during the occlusion period and remained elevated throughout it. Mental stress caused an increase in heart rate and blood pressure and a dilation of the forearm but not of the calf vessels; these changes were smaller in standing than in supine subjects. Resisted breathing and coughing caused an increase in heart rate and in forearm blood flow, but not in calf blood flow. The Valsalva maneuver was followed by decreases in blood flow to the upper and lower limbs. The different responses in forearm and calf vessels can be explained by a central component which triggers a vasodilator pathway (possibly cholinergic) which is distributed to forearm but not to calf vessels.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://circres.ahajournals.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCirculation Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshArterial Occlusive Diseases - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressureen_US
dc.subject.meshCough - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshForearm - Blood Supplyen_US
dc.subject.meshHand - Blood Supplyen_US
dc.subject.meshHeart Rateen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIsometric Contractionen_US
dc.subject.meshLeg - Blood Supplyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMuscle Contractionen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysical Exertionen_US
dc.subject.meshRespiration Disorders - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychological - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshValsalva Maneuveren_US
dc.subject.meshVascular Resistanceen_US
dc.titleDifferent behavior of the resistance vessels of the human calf and forearm during contralateral isometric exercise, mental stress, and abnormal respiratory movementsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailVanhoutte, PM:vanhoutt@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityVanhoutte, PM=rp00238en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid7226455-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0019449607en_US
dc.identifier.volume48en_US
dc.identifier.issue6 IIen_US
dc.identifier.spageIen_US
dc.identifier.epage118en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRusch, NJ=7005728816en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShepherd, JT=7401742522en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebb, RC=6603072737en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVanhoutte, PM=7202304247en_US

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