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Article: Arterial stiffness in children and teenagers: An emerging cardiovascular risk factor

TitleArterial stiffness in children and teenagers: An emerging cardiovascular risk factor
Authors
KeywordsArterial Stiffness
Cardiovascular Risk Factor
Children
Issue Date2005
PublisherMedcom Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkjpaed.org/index.asp
Citation
Hong Kong Journal Of Paediatrics, 2005, v. 10 n. 4, p. 299-306 How to Cite?
AbstractArterial stiffness, the rigidity of the arterial wall, owes its significance to a direct relationship with impedance of the arterial system, and hence the left ventricular afterload. In adults, arterial stiffness has been considered as a marker of vascular disease and is emerging as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. There is accumulating evidence that this may also be true in children. Several paediatric clinical entities may affect normal functioning of the arterial system and may have an impact on long term cardiovascular health. Both prenatal and postnatal influences affect the age-dependent evolution of arterial stiffness. The prenatal influence of reduced fetal growth is illustrated by the findings of increased arterial stiffness in individuals born small and the growth-restricted donor twins in twin-twin transfusion syndrome. Postnatal structural alteration of arteries secondary to childhood vasculitides increases peripheral conduit arterial stiffness significantly. Furthermore, the magnitude of vascular inflammation during the acute phase may have important bearings on late arterial stiffening. Functional alterations of the arteries may also increase arterial stiffness. Endothelial dysfunction, documented in children with familial hypercholesterolaemia, obesity and beta-thalassaemia major, has a direct relationship with arterial stiffening. Alternatively, enhanced sympathetic tone, as might occur in childhood sleep-related disorders, may increase arterial stiffness. With the availability of noninvasive techniques for the determination of arterial stiffness in children, longitudinal studies incorporating this measurement may unveil its prognostic value in the paediatric at-risk population.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170354
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.194
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.123
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, YFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:07:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:07:44Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Journal Of Paediatrics, 2005, v. 10 n. 4, p. 299-306en_US
dc.identifier.issn1013-9923en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170354-
dc.description.abstractArterial stiffness, the rigidity of the arterial wall, owes its significance to a direct relationship with impedance of the arterial system, and hence the left ventricular afterload. In adults, arterial stiffness has been considered as a marker of vascular disease and is emerging as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. There is accumulating evidence that this may also be true in children. Several paediatric clinical entities may affect normal functioning of the arterial system and may have an impact on long term cardiovascular health. Both prenatal and postnatal influences affect the age-dependent evolution of arterial stiffness. The prenatal influence of reduced fetal growth is illustrated by the findings of increased arterial stiffness in individuals born small and the growth-restricted donor twins in twin-twin transfusion syndrome. Postnatal structural alteration of arteries secondary to childhood vasculitides increases peripheral conduit arterial stiffness significantly. Furthermore, the magnitude of vascular inflammation during the acute phase may have important bearings on late arterial stiffening. Functional alterations of the arteries may also increase arterial stiffness. Endothelial dysfunction, documented in children with familial hypercholesterolaemia, obesity and beta-thalassaemia major, has a direct relationship with arterial stiffening. Alternatively, enhanced sympathetic tone, as might occur in childhood sleep-related disorders, may increase arterial stiffness. With the availability of noninvasive techniques for the determination of arterial stiffness in children, longitudinal studies incorporating this measurement may unveil its prognostic value in the paediatric at-risk population.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMedcom Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkjpaed.org/index.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Journal of Paediatricsen_US
dc.subjectArterial Stiffnessen_US
dc.subjectCardiovascular Risk Factoren_US
dc.subjectChildrenen_US
dc.titleArterial stiffness in children and teenagers: An emerging cardiovascular risk factoren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, YF:xfcheung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, YF=rp00382en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-27644501831en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros111401-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-27644501831&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume10en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage299en_US
dc.identifier.epage306en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, YF=7202111067en_US

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