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Article: Delay in ACL reconstruction is associated with more severe and painful meniscal and chondral injuries

TitleDelay in ACL reconstruction is associated with more severe and painful meniscal and chondral injuries
Authors
KeywordsAnterior cruciate ligament
Cartilage
Meniscus
Pain
Issue Date2013
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/orthopedics/journal/167
Citation
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 2013, v. 21 n. 4, p. 928-933 How to Cite?
AbstractPURPOSE: The goal of our study was to investigate the associations between surgical delay, pain and meniscus, and articular cartilage lesions seen at the time of ACL reconstruction. METHODS: One hundred and sixty-two consecutive patients who had received ACL reconstruction were recruited. The preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) questionnaires, and cartilage and meniscal lesions seen at the time of surgery were analysed. RESULTS: Patients with surgery within 12 months were less likely to have meniscus injury (59.8/77.4 %, p = 0.032), and the meniscus injury was more likely to be salvageable. (56.3/36.0 %, p = 0.042). Patients with meniscal tear larger than 10 mm had higher pain intensity than tear <10 mm (mean 6.8/8.2, p = 0.007). Patients older than 35 years of age were more likely to suffer from cartilage injury (76.4/39.1 %, p = 0.004). Patients with cartilage lesions had longer surgical delay (mean 18.9/12.1 months, p = 0.033). The presence of meniscal tear increased the risk of cartilage lesions (p = 0.038, OR = 2.14). Patients with cartilage lesions had a greater pain frequency (mean 6.9/7.7, p = 0.048). Moderate correlation was found between the size of cartilage lesion and the frequency of pain (p = 0.013). CONCLUSIONS: Increased surgical delay was associated with an increased incidence of meniscus and articular cartilage injuries in patients suffering from ACL tear; also, the meniscus was less likely to be salvageable. The presence of cartilage lesions was associated with an increased frequency of pain. Size of meniscal and cartilage lesions was significantly associated with pain. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Retrospective comparative study, Level III.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170198
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.097
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.805
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFok, AWMen_US
dc.contributor.authorYau, WPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:06:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:06:06Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationKnee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 2013, v. 21 n. 4, p. 928-933en_US
dc.identifier.issn0942-2056en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170198-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The goal of our study was to investigate the associations between surgical delay, pain and meniscus, and articular cartilage lesions seen at the time of ACL reconstruction. METHODS: One hundred and sixty-two consecutive patients who had received ACL reconstruction were recruited. The preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) questionnaires, and cartilage and meniscal lesions seen at the time of surgery were analysed. RESULTS: Patients with surgery within 12 months were less likely to have meniscus injury (59.8/77.4 %, p = 0.032), and the meniscus injury was more likely to be salvageable. (56.3/36.0 %, p = 0.042). Patients with meniscal tear larger than 10 mm had higher pain intensity than tear <10 mm (mean 6.8/8.2, p = 0.007). Patients older than 35 years of age were more likely to suffer from cartilage injury (76.4/39.1 %, p = 0.004). Patients with cartilage lesions had longer surgical delay (mean 18.9/12.1 months, p = 0.033). The presence of meniscal tear increased the risk of cartilage lesions (p = 0.038, OR = 2.14). Patients with cartilage lesions had a greater pain frequency (mean 6.9/7.7, p = 0.048). Moderate correlation was found between the size of cartilage lesion and the frequency of pain (p = 0.013). CONCLUSIONS: Increased surgical delay was associated with an increased incidence of meniscus and articular cartilage injuries in patients suffering from ACL tear; also, the meniscus was less likely to be salvageable. The presence of cartilage lesions was associated with an increased frequency of pain. Size of meniscal and cartilage lesions was significantly associated with pain. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Retrospective comparative study, Level III.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/orthopedics/journal/167en_US
dc.relation.ispartofKnee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopyen_US
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subjectAnterior cruciate ligamenten_US
dc.subjectCartilageen_US
dc.subjectMeniscusen_US
dc.subjectPainen_US
dc.titleDelay in ACL reconstruction is associated with more severe and painful meniscal and chondral injuriesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailFok, AWM: augustf@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYau, WP: peterwpy@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYau, WP=rp00500en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00167-012-2027-1en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22552616-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84875376359en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros208259-
dc.identifier.eissn1433-7347-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000316678300022-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYau, WP=7005822441en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFok, AWM=36967881100en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike10659243-

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