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Article: Primary Thoracolumbar Scoliosis in Pinealectomized Chickens

TitlePrimary Thoracolumbar Scoliosis in Pinealectomized Chickens
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.com
Citation
Spine, 2003, v. 28 n. 22, p. 2499-2504 How to Cite?
AbstractStudy Design. This study examines the gross anatomic changes in the chicken spine after pinealectomy and was undertaken because initial observation suggested that the pattern of curve development appears to be different from that reported in the literature. Objective. To characterize the spinal deformity in chickens after pinealectomy. Summary of Background Data. The most common curve pattern seen after pinealectomy in chickens is said to be thoracic curves with structural changes and rotation. This is based largely on radiographic observations and forms the basis of the claim that chicken and human adolescent idiopathic scoliosis are similar. Method. Thirty-five chickens were divided into 2 groups, a pinealectomy group (n = 25) and a control group with no surgery performed (n = 10). The spines were harvested at 3 months of age and examined visually, by radiographs and computed tomography scans. Results. Thirteen out of 25 (52%) of the pinealectomized chickens developed scoliosis. In contrast to previous studies, all the curves were located at the thoraco-lumbar junction with the apex at either T7 or L1. Structural changes including apical vertebral wedging, lordosis (mean of 14.3°), and rotation (mean of 14°) were seen in all cases. Pelvic wing deformity was seen in all cases and significantly contributed to the posterior rotational hump. Conclusion. The primary curve in these chickens is at the thoracolumbar junction. Previous reports of curve pattern based on radiographic findings would not have identified these as the thoracolumbar junction is obscured by the bony pelvis and heavy musculature. The finding of pelvic wing deformity has not been previously reported, and raises the question as to whether these curves are secondary to asymmetric muscle pull.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170052
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.439
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.459
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMCen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorHu, YGen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeong, JCYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:05:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:05:01Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationSpine, 2003, v. 28 n. 22, p. 2499-2504en_US
dc.identifier.issn0362-2436en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170052-
dc.description.abstractStudy Design. This study examines the gross anatomic changes in the chicken spine after pinealectomy and was undertaken because initial observation suggested that the pattern of curve development appears to be different from that reported in the literature. Objective. To characterize the spinal deformity in chickens after pinealectomy. Summary of Background Data. The most common curve pattern seen after pinealectomy in chickens is said to be thoracic curves with structural changes and rotation. This is based largely on radiographic observations and forms the basis of the claim that chicken and human adolescent idiopathic scoliosis are similar. Method. Thirty-five chickens were divided into 2 groups, a pinealectomy group (n = 25) and a control group with no surgery performed (n = 10). The spines were harvested at 3 months of age and examined visually, by radiographs and computed tomography scans. Results. Thirteen out of 25 (52%) of the pinealectomized chickens developed scoliosis. In contrast to previous studies, all the curves were located at the thoraco-lumbar junction with the apex at either T7 or L1. Structural changes including apical vertebral wedging, lordosis (mean of 14.3°), and rotation (mean of 14°) were seen in all cases. Pelvic wing deformity was seen in all cases and significantly contributed to the posterior rotational hump. Conclusion. The primary curve in these chickens is at the thoracolumbar junction. Previous reports of curve pattern based on radiographic findings would not have identified these as the thoracolumbar junction is obscured by the bony pelvis and heavy musculature. The finding of pelvic wing deformity has not been previously reported, and raises the question as to whether these curves are secondary to asymmetric muscle pull.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSpineen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshChickens - Anatomy & Histologyen_US
dc.subject.meshLumbar Vertebrae - Pathology - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshPineal Gland - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshScoliosis - Etiology - Pathology - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshThoracic Vertebrae - Pathology - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computeden_US
dc.titlePrimary Thoracolumbar Scoliosis in Pinealectomized Chickensen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC:cheungmc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, KMC=rp00387en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.BRS.0000092366.30032.97en_US
dc.identifier.pmid14624084-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0344926291en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0344926291&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume28en_US
dc.identifier.issue22en_US
dc.identifier.spage2499en_US
dc.identifier.epage2504en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000186642800002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, KMC=7402406754en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, T=7405564819en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, YG=7407117836en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeong, JCY=35560782200en_US

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