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Article: Anatomical differences and network characteristics underlying smoking cue reactivity

TitleAnatomical differences and network characteristics underlying smoking cue reactivity
Authors
KeywordsAnatomical
ASL
DTI
Resting state functional connectivity
Smoking cue
VBM
Issue Date2011
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimg
Citation
Neuroimage, 2011, v. 54 n. 1, p. 131-141 How to Cite?
AbstractA distributed network of brain regions is linked to drug-related cue responding. However, the relationships between smoking cue-induced phasic activity and possible underlying differences in brain structure, tonic neuronal activity and connectivity between these brain areas are as yet unclear. Twenty-two smokers and 22 controls viewed smoking-related and neutral pictures during a functional arterial spin labeling scanning session. T1, resting functional, and diffusion tensor imaging data were also collected. Six brain areas, dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), dorsal anterior cingulate cortex/cingulate cortex, rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), occipital cortex, and insula/operculum, showed significant smoking cue-elicited activity in smokers when compared with controls and were subjected to secondary analysis for resting state functional connectivity (rsFC), structural, and tonic neuronal activity. rsFC strength between rACC and dlPFC was positively correlated with the cue-elicited activity in dlPFC. Similarly, rsFC strength between dlPFC and dmPFC was positively correlated with the cue-elicited activity in dmPFC while rsFC strength between dmPFC and insula/operculum was negatively correlated with the cue-elicited activity in both dmPFC and insula/operculum, suggesting these brain circuits may facilitate the response to the salient smoking cues. Further, the gray matter density in dlPFC was decreased in smokers and correlated with cue-elicited activity in the same brain area, suggesting a neurobiological mechanism for the impaired cognitive control associated with drug use. Taken together, these results begin to address the underlying neurobiology of smoking cue salience, and may speak to novel treatment strategies and targets for therapeutic interventions. © 2010.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169879
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.463
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.464
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSalmeron, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRoss, TJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGu, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGeng, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorStein, EAen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-25T04:57:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-25T04:57:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeuroimage, 2011, v. 54 n. 1, p. 131-141en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1053-8119en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169879-
dc.description.abstractA distributed network of brain regions is linked to drug-related cue responding. However, the relationships between smoking cue-induced phasic activity and possible underlying differences in brain structure, tonic neuronal activity and connectivity between these brain areas are as yet unclear. Twenty-two smokers and 22 controls viewed smoking-related and neutral pictures during a functional arterial spin labeling scanning session. T1, resting functional, and diffusion tensor imaging data were also collected. Six brain areas, dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), dorsal anterior cingulate cortex/cingulate cortex, rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), occipital cortex, and insula/operculum, showed significant smoking cue-elicited activity in smokers when compared with controls and were subjected to secondary analysis for resting state functional connectivity (rsFC), structural, and tonic neuronal activity. rsFC strength between rACC and dlPFC was positively correlated with the cue-elicited activity in dlPFC. Similarly, rsFC strength between dlPFC and dmPFC was positively correlated with the cue-elicited activity in dmPFC while rsFC strength between dmPFC and insula/operculum was negatively correlated with the cue-elicited activity in both dmPFC and insula/operculum, suggesting these brain circuits may facilitate the response to the salient smoking cues. Further, the gray matter density in dlPFC was decreased in smokers and correlated with cue-elicited activity in the same brain area, suggesting a neurobiological mechanism for the impaired cognitive control associated with drug use. Taken together, these results begin to address the underlying neurobiology of smoking cue salience, and may speak to novel treatment strategies and targets for therapeutic interventions. © 2010.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroImageen_HK
dc.subjectAnatomicalen_HK
dc.subjectASLen_HK
dc.subjectDTIen_HK
dc.subjectResting state functional connectivityen_HK
dc.subjectSmoking cueen_HK
dc.subjectVBMen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Anatomy & Histology - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Mapping - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshCuesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGyrus Cinguli - Anatomy & Histologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHand - Innervationen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshNerve Neten_US
dc.subject.meshPrefrontal Cortex - Anatomy & Histologyen_US
dc.subject.meshReference Valuesen_US
dc.subject.meshSmoking - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSmoking Cessation - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleAnatomical differences and network characteristics underlying smoking cue reactivityen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailGeng, X: gengx@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGeng, X=rp01678en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.07.063en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20688176-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957963685en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77957963685&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume54en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage131en_HK
dc.identifier.epage141en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000283825000016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, X=8570352000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSalmeron, BJ=6603367393en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRoss, TJ=7203043487en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, H=35233258000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGeng, X=34771310000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, Y=7409387192en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStein, EA=7202194954en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7606206-

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