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Article: Native and Non-Native Community Assembly through Edaphic Manipulation: Implications for Habitat Creation and Restoration

TitleNative and Non-Native Community Assembly through Edaphic Manipulation: Implications for Habitat Creation and Restoration
Authors
KeywordsCalifornia grassland
Competition
Exotic species
Invasion
Nutrients
Plantago erecta
Serpentine meadow
Issue Date2011
PublisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/REC
Citation
Restoration Ecology, 2011, v. 19 n. 6, p. 709-716 How to Cite?
AbstractChemical and physical (abiotic) conditions can be determining factors of community assembly and invasibility, but can this observation be used as a practical tool for habitat creation? Serpentine soils, in particular, have three abiotic components thought to confer invasion resistance: a low Ca:Mg ratio, low water-retention capacity, and high concentrations of heavy metals. Consequently, not only do some serpentine-adapted native plants persist only on serpentine soils, but also the community members that depend upon those plants become dependent upon serpentine as well. In an effort to provide additional habitat for the threatened and serpentine-restricted Bay checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas editha bayensis), we experimentally altered a non-serpentine site to mimic the abiotic conditions of serpentine. Attempts to lower the Ca:Mg ratio of soils through the addition of MgSO 4 were unsuccessful. We then altered soil depth through the addition of gravel beds to determine the effects of water stress on native and non-native community composition. We found that shallow soils had lower water content and correspondingly had significantly lower non-native species richness and cover. The results present promising means, but also cautionary information, for habitat creation efforts and demonstrate the possible utility of edaphic manipulation in abating non-native plant invasions. None of the experimental plots supported communities capable of sustaining E. editha populations, emphasizing that the manipulation of physical conditions is only likely to be successful in coordination with other restoration techniques. © 2011 Society for Ecological Restoration International.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169864
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.891
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.985
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBonebrake, TCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNavratil, RTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBoggs, CLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFendorf, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorField, CBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEhrlich, PRen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-25T04:57:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-25T04:57:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationRestoration Ecology, 2011, v. 19 n. 6, p. 709-716en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1061-2971en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169864-
dc.description.abstractChemical and physical (abiotic) conditions can be determining factors of community assembly and invasibility, but can this observation be used as a practical tool for habitat creation? Serpentine soils, in particular, have three abiotic components thought to confer invasion resistance: a low Ca:Mg ratio, low water-retention capacity, and high concentrations of heavy metals. Consequently, not only do some serpentine-adapted native plants persist only on serpentine soils, but also the community members that depend upon those plants become dependent upon serpentine as well. In an effort to provide additional habitat for the threatened and serpentine-restricted Bay checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas editha bayensis), we experimentally altered a non-serpentine site to mimic the abiotic conditions of serpentine. Attempts to lower the Ca:Mg ratio of soils through the addition of MgSO 4 were unsuccessful. We then altered soil depth through the addition of gravel beds to determine the effects of water stress on native and non-native community composition. We found that shallow soils had lower water content and correspondingly had significantly lower non-native species richness and cover. The results present promising means, but also cautionary information, for habitat creation efforts and demonstrate the possible utility of edaphic manipulation in abating non-native plant invasions. None of the experimental plots supported communities capable of sustaining E. editha populations, emphasizing that the manipulation of physical conditions is only likely to be successful in coordination with other restoration techniques. © 2011 Society for Ecological Restoration International.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/RECen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofRestoration Ecologyen_HK
dc.subjectCalifornia grasslanden_HK
dc.subjectCompetitionen_HK
dc.subjectExotic speciesen_HK
dc.subjectInvasionen_HK
dc.subjectNutrientsen_HK
dc.subjectPlantago erectaen_HK
dc.subjectSerpentine meadowen_HK
dc.titleNative and Non-Native Community Assembly through Edaphic Manipulation: Implications for Habitat Creation and Restorationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailBonebrake, TC: tbone@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityBonebrake, TC=rp01676en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1526-100X.2010.00768.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-81355138146en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-81355138146&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage709en_HK
dc.identifier.epage716en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297078600006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBonebrake, TC=12798028100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNavratil, RT=7801614070en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBoggs, CL=7005679578en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFendorf, S=7003935281en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridField, CB=7202432336en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEhrlich, PR=7101963320en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike11069888-

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