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Article: Delayed population explosion of an introduced butterfly

TitleDelayed population explosion of an introduced butterfly
Authors
KeywordsDispersal
Euphydryas
Invasion dynamics
Nymphalidae
Population structure
Issue Date2006
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JAE
Citation
Journal Of Animal Ecology, 2006, v. 75 n. 2, p. 466-475 How to Cite?
Abstract1. The causes of lagged population and geographical range expansions after species introductions are poorly understood, and there are relatively few detailed case studies. 2. We document the 29-year history of population dynamics and structure for a population of Euphydryas gillettii Barnes that was introduced to the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA in 1977. 3. The population size remained low (< 200 individuals) and confined to a single habitat patch (∼2.25 ha) to 1998. These values are similar to those of many other populations within the natural geographical range of the species. 4. However, by 2002 the population increased dramatically to > 3000 individuals and covered ∼70 ha, nearly all to the south of the original site. The direction of population expansion was the same as that of predominant winds. 5. By 2004, the butterfly's local distribution had retracted mainly to three habitat patches. It thus exhibited a 'surge/contraction' form of population growth. Searches within 15 km of the original site yielded no other new populations. 6. In 2005, butterfly numbers crashed, but all three habitat patches remained occupied. The populations within each patch did not decrease in the same proportions, suggesting independent dynamics that are characteristic of metapopulations. 7. We postulate that this behaviour results, in this species, in establishment of satellite populations and, given appropriate habitat structure, may result in lagged or punctuated expansions of introduced populations. © 2006 British Ecological Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169845
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.827
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.359
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBoggs, CLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHoldren, CEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKulahci, IGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBonebrake, TCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorInouye, BDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFay, JPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, EHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEhrlich, PRen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-25T04:57:00Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-25T04:57:00Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Animal Ecology, 2006, v. 75 n. 2, p. 466-475en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0021-8790en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169845-
dc.description.abstract1. The causes of lagged population and geographical range expansions after species introductions are poorly understood, and there are relatively few detailed case studies. 2. We document the 29-year history of population dynamics and structure for a population of Euphydryas gillettii Barnes that was introduced to the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA in 1977. 3. The population size remained low (< 200 individuals) and confined to a single habitat patch (∼2.25 ha) to 1998. These values are similar to those of many other populations within the natural geographical range of the species. 4. However, by 2002 the population increased dramatically to > 3000 individuals and covered ∼70 ha, nearly all to the south of the original site. The direction of population expansion was the same as that of predominant winds. 5. By 2004, the butterfly's local distribution had retracted mainly to three habitat patches. It thus exhibited a 'surge/contraction' form of population growth. Searches within 15 km of the original site yielded no other new populations. 6. In 2005, butterfly numbers crashed, but all three habitat patches remained occupied. The populations within each patch did not decrease in the same proportions, suggesting independent dynamics that are characteristic of metapopulations. 7. We postulate that this behaviour results, in this species, in establishment of satellite populations and, given appropriate habitat structure, may result in lagged or punctuated expansions of introduced populations. © 2006 British Ecological Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JAEen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Animal Ecologyen_HK
dc.subjectDispersalen_HK
dc.subjectEuphydryasen_HK
dc.subjectInvasion dynamicsen_HK
dc.subjectNymphalidaeen_HK
dc.subjectPopulation structureen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshButterflies - Growth & Development - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshColoradoen_US
dc.subject.meshEcosystemen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPopulation Densityen_US
dc.subject.meshPopulation Dynamicsen_US
dc.subject.meshPopulation Growthen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Isolationen_US
dc.titleDelayed population explosion of an introduced butterflyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailBonebrake, TC: tbone@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityBonebrake, TC=rp01676en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2656.2006.01067.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16637999-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645416788en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33645416788&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume75en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage466en_HK
dc.identifier.epage475en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236384700015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.f10001032912-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBoggs, CL=7005679578en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHoldren, CE=12797546200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKulahci, IG=12797377500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBonebrake, TC=12798028100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridInouye, BD=6603932446en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFay, JP=7102222741en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcMillan, A=12797283100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, EH=55454726600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEhrlich, PR=7101963320en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike570690-

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