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Article: DYNAMIC SECURITY DISPATCH: BASIC FORMULATION.

TitleDYNAMIC SECURITY DISPATCH: BASIC FORMULATION.
Authors
Issue Date1983
Citation
Ieee Transactions On Power Apparatus And Systems, 1983, v. PAS-102 n. 7, p. 2145-2154 How to Cite?
AbstractPreliminary results are reported on a direct method for dynamic security dispatch in large power systems. The usual indirect approach starts with an operating point chosen to give optimal economy; then contingency testing using simulation indicates adjustments which may be needed to ensure adequate transient stability after the most likely faults. The nature of the adjustments is derived from ″intuitive feel″ for the system. Using a model given by A. R. Bergen and D. J. Hill, distribution factors are presented for systematically improving transient stability with variation of bus powers, line impedances and bus voltages. By incorporating a stability index into the cost function of economic dispatch, there can be a trade-off between the requirements for economy and stability in choosing an operating point. The method could be adapted to either planning or on-line scheduling to ensure adequate dynamic security. The application of the approach is demonstrated on a 5-bus example system. A brief discussion of the paper is appended.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169616
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChandrashekhar, KSen_US
dc.contributor.authorHill, DJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-25T04:53:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-25T04:53:53Z-
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.identifier.citationIeee Transactions On Power Apparatus And Systems, 1983, v. PAS-102 n. 7, p. 2145-2154en_US
dc.identifier.issn0018-9510en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169616-
dc.description.abstractPreliminary results are reported on a direct method for dynamic security dispatch in large power systems. The usual indirect approach starts with an operating point chosen to give optimal economy; then contingency testing using simulation indicates adjustments which may be needed to ensure adequate transient stability after the most likely faults. The nature of the adjustments is derived from ″intuitive feel″ for the system. Using a model given by A. R. Bergen and D. J. Hill, distribution factors are presented for systematically improving transient stability with variation of bus powers, line impedances and bus voltages. By incorporating a stability index into the cost function of economic dispatch, there can be a trade-off between the requirements for economy and stability in choosing an operating point. The method could be adapted to either planning or on-line scheduling to ensure adequate dynamic security. The application of the approach is demonstrated on a 5-bus example system. A brief discussion of the paper is appended.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofIEEE transactions on power apparatus and systemsen_US
dc.titleDYNAMIC SECURITY DISPATCH: BASIC FORMULATION.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHill, DJ:en_US
dc.identifier.authorityHill, DJ=rp01669en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0020780668en_US
dc.identifier.volumePAS-102en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage2145en_US
dc.identifier.epage2154en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChandrashekhar, KS=6603035269en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHill, DJ=35398599500en_US

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