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Article: Capacity of dental pulp differentiation in mouse molars as demonstrated by allogenic tooth transplantation
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TitleCapacity of dental pulp differentiation in mouse molars as demonstrated by allogenic tooth transplantation
 
AuthorsTakamori, Y1
Suzuki, H1
NakakuraOhshima, K1
Cai, J2
Cho, SW2
Jung, HS2
Ohshima, H1
 
Issue Date2008
 
PublisherHistochemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://intl.jhc.org
 
CitationJournal Of Histochemistry And Cytochemistry, 2008, v. 56 n. 12, p. 1075-1086 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1369/jhc.2008.951558
 
AbstractDental pulp elaborates both bone and dentin under pathological conditions such as tooth replantation/transplantation. This study aims to clarify the capability of dental pulp to elaborate bone tissue in addition to dentin by allogenic tooth transplantation using immunohistochemistry and histochemistry. After extraction of the molars of 3-week-old mice, the roots and pulp floor were resected and immediately allografted into the sublingual region in a littermate. In addition, we studied the contribution of donor and host cells to the regenerated pulp tissue using a combination of allogenic tooth transplantation and lacZ transgenic ROSA26 mice. On Days 5-7, tubular dentin formation started next to the preexisting dentin at the pulp horn where nestin-positive odontoblast-like cells were arranged. Until Day 14, bone-like tissue formation occurred in the pulp chamber, where intense tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells appeared. Furthermore, allogenic transplantation using ROSA26 mice clearly showed that both donor and host cells differentiated into osteoblast-like cells with the assistance of osteoclast-lineage cells, whereas newly differentiated odontoblasts were exclusively derived from donor cells. These results suggest that the odontoblast and osteoblast lineage cells reside in the dental pulp and that both donor and host cells contribute to bone-like tissue formation in the regenerated pulp tissue. © The Histochemical Society, Inc.
 
ISSN0022-1554
2013 Impact Factor: 2.403
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.209
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1369/jhc.2008.951558
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorTakamori, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorSuzuki, H
 
dc.contributor.authorNakakuraOhshima, K
 
dc.contributor.authorCai, J
 
dc.contributor.authorCho, SW
 
dc.contributor.authorJung, HS
 
dc.contributor.authorOhshima, H
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-25T04:52:48Z
 
dc.date.available2012-10-25T04:52:48Z
 
dc.date.issued2008
 
dc.description.abstractDental pulp elaborates both bone and dentin under pathological conditions such as tooth replantation/transplantation. This study aims to clarify the capability of dental pulp to elaborate bone tissue in addition to dentin by allogenic tooth transplantation using immunohistochemistry and histochemistry. After extraction of the molars of 3-week-old mice, the roots and pulp floor were resected and immediately allografted into the sublingual region in a littermate. In addition, we studied the contribution of donor and host cells to the regenerated pulp tissue using a combination of allogenic tooth transplantation and lacZ transgenic ROSA26 mice. On Days 5-7, tubular dentin formation started next to the preexisting dentin at the pulp horn where nestin-positive odontoblast-like cells were arranged. Until Day 14, bone-like tissue formation occurred in the pulp chamber, where intense tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells appeared. Furthermore, allogenic transplantation using ROSA26 mice clearly showed that both donor and host cells differentiated into osteoblast-like cells with the assistance of osteoclast-lineage cells, whereas newly differentiated odontoblasts were exclusively derived from donor cells. These results suggest that the odontoblast and osteoblast lineage cells reside in the dental pulp and that both donor and host cells contribute to bone-like tissue formation in the regenerated pulp tissue. © The Histochemical Society, Inc.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Histochemistry And Cytochemistry, 2008, v. 56 n. 12, p. 1075-1086 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1369/jhc.2008.951558
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1369/jhc.2008.951558
 
dc.identifier.epage1086
 
dc.identifier.issn0022-1554
2013 Impact Factor: 2.403
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.209
 
dc.identifier.issue12
 
dc.identifier.pmid18765839
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-56449123872
 
dc.identifier.spage1075
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169552
 
dc.identifier.volume56
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherHistochemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://intl.jhc.org
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAcid Phosphatase - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals
 
dc.subject.meshCell Differentiation
 
dc.subject.meshCell Proliferation
 
dc.subject.meshDental Pulp - Cytology - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshHistocytochemistry
 
dc.subject.meshIntermediate Filament Proteins - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshIsoenzymes - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshLac Operon
 
dc.subject.meshMice
 
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred Icr
 
dc.subject.meshMice, Transgenic
 
dc.subject.meshMolar - Cytology - Metabolism - Transplantation
 
dc.subject.meshMouth Floor
 
dc.subject.meshNerve Tissue Proteins - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshOsteopontin - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshTransplantation, Homologous
 
dc.titleCapacity of dental pulp differentiation in mouse molars as demonstrated by allogenic tooth transplantation
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Cho, SW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Jung, HS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ohshima, H</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Dental pulp elaborates both bone and dentin under pathological conditions such as tooth replantation/transplantation. This study aims to clarify the capability of dental pulp to elaborate bone tissue in addition to dentin by allogenic tooth transplantation using immunohistochemistry and histochemistry. After extraction of the molars of 3-week-old mice, the roots and pulp floor were resected and immediately allografted into the sublingual region in a littermate. In addition, we studied the contribution of donor and host cells to the regenerated pulp tissue using a combination of allogenic tooth transplantation and lacZ transgenic ROSA26 mice. On Days 5-7, tubular dentin formation started next to the preexisting dentin at the pulp horn where nestin-positive odontoblast-like cells were arranged. Until Day 14, bone-like tissue formation occurred in the pulp chamber, where intense tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells appeared. Furthermore, allogenic transplantation using ROSA26 mice clearly showed that both donor and host cells differentiated into osteoblast-like cells with the assistance of osteoclast-lineage cells, whereas newly differentiated odontoblasts were exclusively derived from donor cells. These results suggest that the odontoblast and osteoblast lineage cells reside in the dental pulp and that both donor and host cells contribute to bone-like tissue formation in the regenerated pulp tissue. &#169; The Histochemical Society, Inc.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Niigata University School of Medicine
  2. Yonsei University