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Article: Patterns of and hypotheses for infection-related cancers in a Chinese population with rapid economic development

TitlePatterns of and hypotheses for infection-related cancers in a Chinese population with rapid economic development
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=HYG
Citation
Epidemiology and Infection, 2012, v. 140 n. 10, p. 1904-1919 How to Cite?
AbstractWith economic development, non-communicable diseases replace infectious diseases as the leading cause of death; how such transition occurs for infectious diseases with long latency has rarely been considered. We took advantage of a Chinese population with rapid economic development in the mid-20th century to study changing patterns of infection-related cancers. We used sex-specific Poisson regression to estimate age, period and cohort effects on adult deaths 1976-2005 from eight infection-related cancers in Hong Kong. Cervical, head and neck, and oesophageal cancers, associated with sexually transmitted infections, decreased for the first birth cohorts with sexual debut in a more developed environment. Leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, associated with vertically transmitted infections, decreased for the first cohorts born into a more developed environment. Birth cohort patterns were unclear for nasopharyngeal, stomach and liver cancers. Mortality rates for cancers related to early infections may depend on population history, with delayed reductions for some infection-related cancers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169289
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.515
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.320
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChung, RYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-18T08:49:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-18T08:49:04Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiology and Infection, 2012, v. 140 n. 10, p. 1904-1919en_US
dc.identifier.issn0950-2688-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169289-
dc.description.abstractWith economic development, non-communicable diseases replace infectious diseases as the leading cause of death; how such transition occurs for infectious diseases with long latency has rarely been considered. We took advantage of a Chinese population with rapid economic development in the mid-20th century to study changing patterns of infection-related cancers. We used sex-specific Poisson regression to estimate age, period and cohort effects on adult deaths 1976-2005 from eight infection-related cancers in Hong Kong. Cervical, head and neck, and oesophageal cancers, associated with sexually transmitted infections, decreased for the first birth cohorts with sexual debut in a more developed environment. Leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, associated with vertically transmitted infections, decreased for the first cohorts born into a more developed environment. Birth cohort patterns were unclear for nasopharyngeal, stomach and liver cancers. Mortality rates for cancers related to early infections may depend on population history, with delayed reductions for some infection-related cancers.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=HYG-
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemiology and Infectionen_US
dc.rightsEpidemiology and Infection. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group-
dc.subject.meshEconomic Development - trends-
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshSexually Transmitted Diseases - complications-
dc.titlePatterns of and hypotheses for infection-related cancers in a Chinese population with rapid economic developmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChung, RY: rchung@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_US
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0950268811002469-
dc.identifier.pmid22142566-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84865463570-
dc.identifier.hkuros211594en_US
dc.identifier.volume140en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage1904en_US
dc.identifier.epage1919en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000308845100023-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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