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Article: Being active or flexible? Role of control coping on quality of life among patients with gastrointestinal cancer

TitleBeing active or flexible? Role of control coping on quality of life among patients with gastrointestinal cancer
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
Psycho-Oncology, 2012, v. 21 n. 2, p. 211-218 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: This study examined the link between coping and quality of life among patients with gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. Two hypotheses were tested. The active-personality hypothesis states that quality of life is associated with the predominant use of primary control coping (PCC) in general. The situational-flexibility hypothesis states that quality of life is related to flexible deployment of PCC and secondary control coping (SCC) according to situational controllability. Methods: Participants were 180 Chinese adult patients diagnosed with colon or liver cancer. Their perceived controllability of stressors, coping, and quality of life were compared with those of a sex-and age-matched community sample. Results: Three groups with distinct coping patterns were identified: (a) a flexible group characterized by the use of PCC in controllable situations but SCC in uncontrollable situations, (b) an active group characterized by predominant use of PCC in most situations, and (c) a passive group characterized by predominant use of SCC or avoidant coping in most situations. Patients in the active and the flexible groups had higher perceived controllability and psychological well-being scores than those in the passive group. Conclusions: Our results provide support for both the active-personality and the situational-flexibility hypotheses among GI cancer patients. Clinical and research implications of the findings are discussed. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169097
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, NYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChio, JHMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, AOOen_US
dc.contributor.authorHui, WMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:43Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsycho-Oncology, 2012, v. 21 n. 2, p. 211-218en_US
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169097-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: This study examined the link between coping and quality of life among patients with gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. Two hypotheses were tested. The active-personality hypothesis states that quality of life is associated with the predominant use of primary control coping (PCC) in general. The situational-flexibility hypothesis states that quality of life is related to flexible deployment of PCC and secondary control coping (SCC) according to situational controllability. Methods: Participants were 180 Chinese adult patients diagnosed with colon or liver cancer. Their perceived controllability of stressors, coping, and quality of life were compared with those of a sex-and age-matched community sample. Results: Three groups with distinct coping patterns were identified: (a) a flexible group characterized by the use of PCC in controllable situations but SCC in uncontrollable situations, (b) an active group characterized by predominant use of PCC in most situations, and (c) a passive group characterized by predominant use of SCC or avoidant coping in most situations. Patients in the active and the flexible groups had higher perceived controllability and psychological well-being scores than those in the passive group. Conclusions: Our results provide support for both the active-personality and the situational-flexibility hypotheses among GI cancer patients. Clinical and research implications of the findings are discussed. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807en_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncologyen_US
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.rightsSpecial Statement for Preprint only Before publication: 'This is a preprint of an article accepted for publication in [The Journal of Pathology] Copyright © ([year]) ([Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland])'. After publication: the preprint notice should be amended to follows: 'This is a preprint of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the Contribution as published in the print edition of the Journal]' For Cochrane Library/ Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, add statement & acknowledgement : ‘This review is published as a Cochrane Review in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 20XX, Issue X. Cochrane Reviews are regularly updated as new evidence emerges and in response to comments and criticisms, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews should be consulted for the most recent version of the Review.’ Please include reference to the Review and hyperlink to the original version using the following format e.g. Authors. Title of Review. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 20XX, Issue #. Art. No.: CD00XXXX. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD00XXXX (insert persistent link to the article by using the URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD00XXXX) (This statement should refer to the most recent issue of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in which the Review published.)-
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDefense Mechanismsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshGastrointestinal Neoplasms - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInternal-External Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Stagingen_US
dc.subject.meshPatients - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshQuality Of Lifeen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychological - Psychologyen_US
dc.titleBeing active or flexible? Role of control coping on quality of life among patients with gastrointestinal canceren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheng, C:ceci-cheng@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, C=rp00588en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.1892en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22271542-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84856257341en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros200280-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84856257341&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume21en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage211en_US
dc.identifier.epage218en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1099-1611-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000299415200013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, C=7404798168en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, NY=54927041400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChio, JHM=42360930700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, P=7403497841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, AOO=54927841700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, WM=7103196477en_US

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