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Article: Using peripersonal warning signals to orient a driver's gaze

TitleUsing peripersonal warning signals to orient a driver's gaze
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://hfs.sagepub.com
Citation
Human Factors, 2009, v. 51 n. 4, p. 539-556 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: We report a series of three experiments designed to assess the relative speed with which people can initiate speeded head-orienting responses following the presentation of spatial warning signals. Background: Recent cognitive neuroscience findings have shown that the human brain tends to treat stimuli occurring in peripersonal space as being somehow more behaviorally relevant and attention demanding than stimuli occurring in extrapersonal space. These brain mechanisms may be exploited in the design of warning signals. Method: Experiment 1 assessed the effectiveness of various different unisensory warning signals in eliciting a head-turning response to look at the potential source of danger requiring participants' immediate attention; Experiment 2 assessed the latency of a driver's responses to events occurring in the cued direction; Experiment 3 assessed the relative effectiveness of various warning signals in reorienting a person's gaze back to a central driving task while he or she was distracted by a secondary task. Results: The results show that participants initiated head-turning movements and made speeded discrimination or braking responses significantly more rapidly following the presentation of a close rear auditory warning signal than following the presentation of either a far frontal auditory warning signal, a vibrotactile warning signal presented to their waist, or a peripheral visual warning signal. Conclusion: These results support the claim that the introduction of peripersonal warning signals results in a significant performance advantage relative to traditionally designed warnings. Application: Warning systems that have been designed around the constraints of the human brain offer great potential in the future design of multisensory interfaces. Copyright © 2009, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169071
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.37
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.807
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSpence, Cen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:26Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:26Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHuman Factors, 2009, v. 51 n. 4, p. 539-556en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0018-7208en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169071-
dc.description.abstractObjective: We report a series of three experiments designed to assess the relative speed with which people can initiate speeded head-orienting responses following the presentation of spatial warning signals. Background: Recent cognitive neuroscience findings have shown that the human brain tends to treat stimuli occurring in peripersonal space as being somehow more behaviorally relevant and attention demanding than stimuli occurring in extrapersonal space. These brain mechanisms may be exploited in the design of warning signals. Method: Experiment 1 assessed the effectiveness of various different unisensory warning signals in eliciting a head-turning response to look at the potential source of danger requiring participants' immediate attention; Experiment 2 assessed the latency of a driver's responses to events occurring in the cued direction; Experiment 3 assessed the relative effectiveness of various warning signals in reorienting a person's gaze back to a central driving task while he or she was distracted by a secondary task. Results: The results show that participants initiated head-turning movements and made speeded discrimination or braking responses significantly more rapidly following the presentation of a close rear auditory warning signal than following the presentation of either a far frontal auditory warning signal, a vibrotactile warning signal presented to their waist, or a peripheral visual warning signal. Conclusion: These results support the claim that the introduction of peripersonal warning signals results in a significant performance advantage relative to traditionally designed warnings. Application: Warning systems that have been designed around the constraints of the human brain offer great potential in the future design of multisensory interfaces. Copyright © 2009, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://hfs.sagepub.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAuditory Perceptionen_US
dc.subject.meshAutomobile Driving - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshComputer Simulationen_US
dc.subject.meshCuesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychomotor Performanceen_US
dc.subject.meshReaction Timeen_US
dc.subject.meshSpace Perceptionen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleUsing peripersonal warning signals to orient a driver's gazeen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, C: cristyho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, C=rp00859en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0018720809341735en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19899363-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70349671434en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70349671434&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume51en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage539en_HK
dc.identifier.epage556en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000270351000009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, C=8697555100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSpence, C=7102013693en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6064777-

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