File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Convergence of the visual field split: Hemispheric modeling of face and object recognition

TitleConvergence of the visual field split: Hemispheric modeling of face and object recognition
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherM I T Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://mitpress.mit.edu/jocn
Citation
Journal Of Cognitive Neuroscience, 2008, v. 20 n. 12, p. 2298-2307 How to Cite?
AbstractAnatomical evidence shows that our visual field is initially split along the vertical midline and contralaterally projected to different hemispheres. It remains unclear at which processing stage the split information converges. In the current study, we applied the Double Filtering by Frequency (DFF) theory (Ivry & Robertson, 1998) to modeling the visual field split; the theory assumes a right-hemisphere/low-frequency bias. We compared three cognitive architectures with different timings of convergence and examined their cognitive plausibility to account for the left-side bias effect in face perception observed in human data. We show that the early convergence model failed to show the left-side bias effect. The modeling, hence, suggests that the convergence may take place at an intermediate or late stage, at least after information has been extracted/encoded separately in the two hemispheres, a fact that is often overlooked in computational modeling of cognitive processes. Comparative anatomical data suggest that this separate encoding process that results in differential frequency biases in the two hemispheres may be engaged from V1 up to the level of area V3a and V4v, and converge at least after the lateral occipital region. The left-side bias effect in our model was also observed in Greeble recognition; the modeling, hence, also provides testable predictions about whether the left-side bias effect may also be observed in (expertise-level) object recognition. © 2008 Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169056
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.559
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.712
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHsiao, JHWen_US
dc.contributor.authorShieh, DXen_US
dc.contributor.authorCottrell, GWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:16Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Cognitive Neuroscience, 2008, v. 20 n. 12, p. 2298-2307en_US
dc.identifier.issn0898-929Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169056-
dc.description.abstractAnatomical evidence shows that our visual field is initially split along the vertical midline and contralaterally projected to different hemispheres. It remains unclear at which processing stage the split information converges. In the current study, we applied the Double Filtering by Frequency (DFF) theory (Ivry & Robertson, 1998) to modeling the visual field split; the theory assumes a right-hemisphere/low-frequency bias. We compared three cognitive architectures with different timings of convergence and examined their cognitive plausibility to account for the left-side bias effect in face perception observed in human data. We show that the early convergence model failed to show the left-side bias effect. The modeling, hence, suggests that the convergence may take place at an intermediate or late stage, at least after information has been extracted/encoded separately in the two hemispheres, a fact that is often overlooked in computational modeling of cognitive processes. Comparative anatomical data suggest that this separate encoding process that results in differential frequency biases in the two hemispheres may be engaged from V1 up to the level of area V3a and V4v, and converge at least after the lateral occipital region. The left-side bias effect in our model was also observed in Greeble recognition; the modeling, hence, also provides testable predictions about whether the left-side bias effect may also be observed in (expertise-level) object recognition. © 2008 Massachusetts Institute of Technology.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherM I T Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://mitpress.mit.edu/jocnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Cognitive Neuroscienceen_US
dc.subject.meshFaceen_US
dc.subject.meshFacial Expressionen_US
dc.subject.meshFunctional Laterality - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshPattern Recognition, Visual - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhotic Stimulation - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshPrincipal Component Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshSpace Perception - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshVisual Fields - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleConvergence of the visual field split: Hemispheric modeling of face and object recognitionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHsiao, JHW:jhsiao@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHsiao, JHW=rp00632en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1162/jocn.2008.20162en_US
dc.identifier.pmid18457514-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-56649085326en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-56649085326&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume20en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage2298en_US
dc.identifier.epage2307en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1530-8898-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000260974600015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHsiao, JHW=7101605473en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShieh, DX=25654138400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCottrell, GW=7102792906en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike2945252-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats