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Article: Ostracism increases social susceptibility

TitleOstracism increases social susceptibility
Authors
KeywordsCompliance
Ostracism
Rejection
Social Exclusion
Social Susceptibility
Issue Date2008
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk./journals/titles/15534510.asp
Citation
Social Influence, 2008, v. 3 n. 3, p. 143-153 How to Cite?
AbstractOstracism, the act of ignoring and excluding, is a universally applied tactic of social control. Individuals who detect ostracism often change their behaviors to be readmitted into the group, even if it means becoming excessively socially susceptible to influence. We tested whether ostracized individuals are more socially susceptible to a subsequent influence attempt. In this study, 65 undergraduates were randomly assigned to a 2 (Inclusion or Ostracism) × 3 (Compliance tactic: foot-in-the door, target request only, door-in-the-face) between-participants design. The participants played Cyberball and were either included or ostracized, and then they were approached with a request to donate money. Despite no differences between the three tactics, ostracism increased compliance across all request types. Our discussion focuses on the implications for ostracism-induced social susceptibility.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169051
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.15
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.569
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCarterSowell, ARen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, KDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:10Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationSocial Influence, 2008, v. 3 n. 3, p. 143-153en_US
dc.identifier.issn1553-4510en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169051-
dc.description.abstractOstracism, the act of ignoring and excluding, is a universally applied tactic of social control. Individuals who detect ostracism often change their behaviors to be readmitted into the group, even if it means becoming excessively socially susceptible to influence. We tested whether ostracized individuals are more socially susceptible to a subsequent influence attempt. In this study, 65 undergraduates were randomly assigned to a 2 (Inclusion or Ostracism) × 3 (Compliance tactic: foot-in-the door, target request only, door-in-the-face) between-participants design. The participants played Cyberball and were either included or ostracized, and then they were approached with a request to donate money. Despite no differences between the three tactics, ostracism increased compliance across all request types. Our discussion focuses on the implications for ostracism-induced social susceptibility.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk./journals/titles/15534510.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Influenceen_US
dc.rightsSocial Influence. Copyright © Psychology Press.-
dc.subjectComplianceen_US
dc.subjectOstracismen_US
dc.subjectRejectionen_US
dc.subjectSocial Exclusionen_US
dc.subjectSocial Susceptibilityen_US
dc.titleOstracism increases social susceptibilityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, Z:chenz@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChen, Z=rp00629en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/15534510802204868en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-51249100169en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros158564-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-51249100169&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume3en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage143en_US
dc.identifier.epage153en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000207736000001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCarterSowell, AR=24773079900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, Z=24723641900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, KD=7404142839en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike7145577-

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