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Article: Visual span: A sensory bottleneck on reading speed

TitleVisual span: A sensory bottleneck on reading speed
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
Journal Of Vision, 2002, v. 2 n. 7, p. 279a How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose. Visual span profiles are plots of letter-recognition accuracy as a function of letter position left or right of the midline. We hypothesize that the size of the visual span, summarized as the area under the profile, limits reading speed in normal and low vision. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the correlation between size of the visual span and reading speed for variations in the contrast, size and retinal eccentricity of letters. Method. In one experiment, visual-span profiles and RSVP reading speeds were measured for 5 normally sighted subjects for letter contrasts ranging from threshold (1.5%) to 92%. In a second experiment, similar measurements were made for 3 subjects for letter sizes ranging from the acuity limit (4') to 4°. Finally, similar measurements were obtained from our previous published work for retinal eccentricities from 0° to 20°. Results. For all 3 data sets, reading speed covaried closely with the size of the visual span, with high correlations between log reading speed and area under the visual-span profiles. Both rose sharply at low contrast and leveled out at high contrast (individual correlations from .97 to .99). For character size, both peaked for middle values with a decline for small and large letters (individual correlations from .75 to .99). For eccentricity, both declined in peripheral vision (group correlation = .98). Conclusions. Our findings are consistent with the view that reduction of the size of the visual span limits normal reading speed near the acuity limit, near contrast threshold, and in peripheral vision. Because most reading deficits in low vision are associated with losses in acuity, contrast sensitivity or field, our findings suggest that a reduced visual span is a key factor in limiting low-vision reading.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169045
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLegge, GEen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, HWen_US
dc.contributor.authorOwens, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, SHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChung, STLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:06Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Vision, 2002, v. 2 n. 7, p. 279aen_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169045-
dc.description.abstractPurpose. Visual span profiles are plots of letter-recognition accuracy as a function of letter position left or right of the midline. We hypothesize that the size of the visual span, summarized as the area under the profile, limits reading speed in normal and low vision. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the correlation between size of the visual span and reading speed for variations in the contrast, size and retinal eccentricity of letters. Method. In one experiment, visual-span profiles and RSVP reading speeds were measured for 5 normally sighted subjects for letter contrasts ranging from threshold (1.5%) to 92%. In a second experiment, similar measurements were made for 3 subjects for letter sizes ranging from the acuity limit (4') to 4°. Finally, similar measurements were obtained from our previous published work for retinal eccentricities from 0° to 20°. Results. For all 3 data sets, reading speed covaried closely with the size of the visual span, with high correlations between log reading speed and area under the visual-span profiles. Both rose sharply at low contrast and leveled out at high contrast (individual correlations from .97 to .99). For character size, both peaked for middle values with a decline for small and large letters (individual correlations from .75 to .99). For eccentricity, both declined in peripheral vision (group correlation = .98). Conclusions. Our findings are consistent with the view that reduction of the size of the visual span limits normal reading speed near the acuity limit, near contrast threshold, and in peripheral vision. Because most reading deficits in low vision are associated with losses in acuity, contrast sensitivity or field, our findings suggest that a reduced visual span is a key factor in limiting low-vision reading.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.titleVisual span: A sensory bottleneck on reading speeden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, SH:singhang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, SH=rp00590en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/2.7.279en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4243196873en_US
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage279aen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLegge, GE=7005064208en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, HW=7501492287en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOwens, D=16033675400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, SH=7202473508en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, STL=10440472700en_US

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