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Article: Investigating the spatial modulation transfer function of attention - Distinguishing between effects of false target crowding and spatial frequency

TitleInvestigating the spatial modulation transfer function of attention - Distinguishing between effects of false target crowding and spatial frequency
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
Journal Of Vision, 2003, v. 3 n. 9, p. 569a How to Cite?
AbstractWe wish to study observers' ability to divide attention more and more finely in a search task, i.e., to study the spatial modulation transfer function of attention. Prior to viewing a black-and-white test stimulus, subjects are shown a map of the search regions (defined by a red-green grating) where attended stripes - within which a target (T) can occur - are green, and nontarget areas are red (or vice versa for other observers). Observers tend to ignore the fine structure required by the map unless false targets (FTs) are placed in unattended areas to force confinement of attention to the to-be-attended stripes. As the stripes become thinner [spatial frequency (SF) of the attend/nonattend grating increases] search performance deteriorates (ARVO, 2001; VSS, 2002). Unfortunately, there is a confounding effect of FT-crowding: at high SFs, FTs are closer to Ts than at lower SFs. We discriminate the effects of attention and FT-crowding by, unbeknownst to the observers, embedding occasional one-FT trials (stimuli with only one FT) in a series of stimuli with many FTs. Results: For identical one-FT stimuli (obviously with the same FT-T distance), search performance still consistently decreases with an increase in the to-be-attended SF. Attempting to divide attention finely has a cost (which is why observers don't do it unless forced to by FTs). However, crowding also has a big effect - more and/or closer FTs impair T detection. Discriminating the effects of FT-crowding from spatial frequency fall-off enables a more accurate model of the maleability of visual spatial attention, per se.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169044
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGobell, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorTseng, CHen_US
dc.contributor.authorSperling, Gen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:06Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Vision, 2003, v. 3 n. 9, p. 569aen_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169044-
dc.description.abstractWe wish to study observers' ability to divide attention more and more finely in a search task, i.e., to study the spatial modulation transfer function of attention. Prior to viewing a black-and-white test stimulus, subjects are shown a map of the search regions (defined by a red-green grating) where attended stripes - within which a target (T) can occur - are green, and nontarget areas are red (or vice versa for other observers). Observers tend to ignore the fine structure required by the map unless false targets (FTs) are placed in unattended areas to force confinement of attention to the to-be-attended stripes. As the stripes become thinner [spatial frequency (SF) of the attend/nonattend grating increases] search performance deteriorates (ARVO, 2001; VSS, 2002). Unfortunately, there is a confounding effect of FT-crowding: at high SFs, FTs are closer to Ts than at lower SFs. We discriminate the effects of attention and FT-crowding by, unbeknownst to the observers, embedding occasional one-FT trials (stimuli with only one FT) in a series of stimuli with many FTs. Results: For identical one-FT stimuli (obviously with the same FT-T distance), search performance still consistently decreases with an increase in the to-be-attended SF. Attempting to divide attention finely has a cost (which is why observers don't do it unless forced to by FTs). However, crowding also has a big effect - more and/or closer FTs impair T detection. Discriminating the effects of FT-crowding from spatial frequency fall-off enables a more accurate model of the maleability of visual spatial attention, per se.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.titleInvestigating the spatial modulation transfer function of attention - Distinguishing between effects of false target crowding and spatial frequencyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTseng, CH:tseng@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTseng, CH=rp00640en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/3.9.569en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4243180462en_US
dc.identifier.volume3en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage569aen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGobell, J=6602576418en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTseng, CH=7402541752en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSperling, G=7006467228en_US

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