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Article: Attentional sensitization to specific colors

TitleAttentional sensitization to specific colors
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
Journal Of Vision, 2003, v. 3 n. 9, p. 869a How to Cite?
AbstractThe perceived direction of motion (e.g., up/down) in an ambiguous third-order motion stimulus can be changed by instructions to attend to a particular color (Blaser et al., 1999) or by prior practice in a color-search task (Tseng et al., 2000). In these experiments, subjects performed thousands of consecutive trials attending to only one color. Tseng found that sensitization to that color survived for a month. Is there attentional sensitization when observers shift attention between colors every N trials, N = [1, 200]. Procedure. In our third-order ambiguous-motion paradigm, even frames contain red/green isoluminant gratings, odd frames contain high/low contrast texture gratings. Apparent motion is determined by figure-ground, i.e., the movement of salient areas. Salience is determined by the difference from the gray background - areas of high contrast or of high color saturation have greater salience. Attention to a color produces a change in motion-direction perception that is equivalent to an increase in saturation, i.e., an increase in salience. Three different attend cues for each trial were used: letters, color patchs, and spoken color names. After observers attended to red stripes, attention was switched to green every N trials, and vs vs. The results were compared to the no-instruction condition. Results. Most observers failed to perceive motion above 8 Hz. Below 4 Hz, all modes of instruction and all values of N produced shifts in observers' psychometric functions equivalent to increasing the saturation of the attended color by 10-20%. This effect of "fast," voluntary attention, while highly significant, is half of what we measured with prolonged attention to the same color.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169043
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTseng, CHen_US
dc.contributor.authorGobell, JLen_US
dc.contributor.authorSperling, Gen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:05Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:05Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Vision, 2003, v. 3 n. 9, p. 869aen_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169043-
dc.description.abstractThe perceived direction of motion (e.g., up/down) in an ambiguous third-order motion stimulus can be changed by instructions to attend to a particular color (Blaser et al., 1999) or by prior practice in a color-search task (Tseng et al., 2000). In these experiments, subjects performed thousands of consecutive trials attending to only one color. Tseng found that sensitization to that color survived for a month. Is there attentional sensitization when observers shift attention between colors every N trials, N = [1, 200]. Procedure. In our third-order ambiguous-motion paradigm, even frames contain red/green isoluminant gratings, odd frames contain high/low contrast texture gratings. Apparent motion is determined by figure-ground, i.e., the movement of salient areas. Salience is determined by the difference from the gray background - areas of high contrast or of high color saturation have greater salience. Attention to a color produces a change in motion-direction perception that is equivalent to an increase in saturation, i.e., an increase in salience. Three different attend cues for each trial were used: letters, color patchs, and spoken color names. After observers attended to red stripes, attention was switched to green every N trials, and vs vs. The results were compared to the no-instruction condition. Results. Most observers failed to perceive motion above 8 Hz. Below 4 Hz, all modes of instruction and all values of N produced shifts in observers' psychometric functions equivalent to increasing the saturation of the attended color by 10-20%. This effect of "fast," voluntary attention, while highly significant, is half of what we measured with prolonged attention to the same color.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.titleAttentional sensitization to specific colorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTseng, CH:tseng@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTseng, CH=rp00640en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/3.9.869en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4243171463en_US
dc.identifier.volume3en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage869aen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTseng, CH=7402541752en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGobell, JL=6602576418en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSperling, G=7006467228en_US

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