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Article: Lack of benefit from information across spatial scales in an object recognition task

TitleLack of benefit from information across spatial scales in an object recognition task
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
Journal Of Vision, 2002, v. 2 n. 7, p. 694a How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose. Information in an image can be represented in separate spatial-frequency bands, or spatial scales. If non-redundant information is available in different spatial scales, access to multiple scales should provide better recognition performance than access to a single scale. An image can also be divided into different spatial regions. If there is a capacity constraint on the amount of visual information that can be processed at one time, there will be a trade off in the resolution of the spatial scale and the size of the region analyzed. Such a capacity constraint can be simulated by using a restricted "window" which varies in size according to the spatial scale. We asked how effectively people would use multi-scale information when they can control the spatial scale and spatial location of such a window in an object recognition task. Method. Three normally sighted subjects recognized grayscale images on a computer screen. The stimulus set consisted of images of four 3D objects (wedge, pyramid, cylinder and cone) in eight different views. Spatial scales used were 2, 4, 8 and 16 cycles/object. The square window had a linear size of about half a cycle at the scale used. Subjects used a mouse to control the spatial location of the window in discrete steps and four different keys on the keyboard to select the spatial scale. The subjects were instructed to maximize accuracy, not speed. Results. Averaged percent correct across subjects for the multi-scale condition was 54.17%. Averaged percent correct for the 2-, 4-, 8- and 16-single conditions were 42.71%, 55.21%, 64.58% and 62.50% respectively. Conclusions. Recognition accuracy in the multi-scale condition was poorer than that in some of the single-scale conditions. Our findings indicate that human observers did not benefit from access to information in different spatial scales.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169041
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, SHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLegge, GEen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:03Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Vision, 2002, v. 2 n. 7, p. 694aen_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169041-
dc.description.abstractPurpose. Information in an image can be represented in separate spatial-frequency bands, or spatial scales. If non-redundant information is available in different spatial scales, access to multiple scales should provide better recognition performance than access to a single scale. An image can also be divided into different spatial regions. If there is a capacity constraint on the amount of visual information that can be processed at one time, there will be a trade off in the resolution of the spatial scale and the size of the region analyzed. Such a capacity constraint can be simulated by using a restricted "window" which varies in size according to the spatial scale. We asked how effectively people would use multi-scale information when they can control the spatial scale and spatial location of such a window in an object recognition task. Method. Three normally sighted subjects recognized grayscale images on a computer screen. The stimulus set consisted of images of four 3D objects (wedge, pyramid, cylinder and cone) in eight different views. Spatial scales used were 2, 4, 8 and 16 cycles/object. The square window had a linear size of about half a cycle at the scale used. Subjects used a mouse to control the spatial location of the window in discrete steps and four different keys on the keyboard to select the spatial scale. The subjects were instructed to maximize accuracy, not speed. Results. Averaged percent correct across subjects for the multi-scale condition was 54.17%. Averaged percent correct for the 2-, 4-, 8- and 16-single conditions were 42.71%, 55.21%, 64.58% and 62.50% respectively. Conclusions. Recognition accuracy in the multi-scale condition was poorer than that in some of the single-scale conditions. Our findings indicate that human observers did not benefit from access to information in different spatial scales.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.titleLack of benefit from information across spatial scales in an object recognition tasken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, SH:singhang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, SH=rp00590en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/2.7.694en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4243121663en_US
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage694aen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, SH=7202473508en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLegge, GE=7005064208en_US

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