File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Response to perturbations of visual feedback during reaching movements

TitleResponse to perturbations of visual feedback during reaching movements
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
Journal Of Vision, 2001, v. 1 n. 3, p. 1a How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: Being able to see one's hand while reaching for an object is known to improve accuracy and speed. However, there remains some question as to how much this information contributes, and whether it is used for continuous control. A standard technique for investigating a dynamic control process is to measure its perturbation response. We applied this technique to study visual control of reaching by testing perturbations of visual feedback during movements in a virtual environment. Method: The subjects' task was to reach and touch a succession of targets in a virtual environment. Visual targets were aligned with a tabletop, which provided consistent haptic feedback. Images presented by a monitor were viewed through a horizontal mirror, using shutter glasses to present left and right stereo views. The mirror occluded subjects' view of their hand. Visual feedback was provided by a sphere representing a subject's fingertip ( a virtual finger), which was updated in real-time using an optical tracking system and markers on a subjects' finger. In a baseline condition, the virtual finger accurately tracked the location of the unseen finger throughout a trial. In perturbed trials, a small discrepancy (2cm) between the actual and virtual finger was added at variable points during a movement. Perturbation onsets were gradual to be less noticeable. Results: Across perturbed trials, hand trajectories typically showed an adjustment at the end of a movement to correct error in the initial reach. When perturbations were early in the movement, there were also corrective adjustments before approaching the target. Detectable responses were observed as early as 40% of the way along the movement path, with delays of around 200ms. Conclusion: Visual feedback from the hand is used not only to control fine adjustments at the end of a reach, but also to guide movement during the initial phase of reaching.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169038
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorKnill, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:02Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Vision, 2001, v. 1 n. 3, p. 1aen_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169038-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Being able to see one's hand while reaching for an object is known to improve accuracy and speed. However, there remains some question as to how much this information contributes, and whether it is used for continuous control. A standard technique for investigating a dynamic control process is to measure its perturbation response. We applied this technique to study visual control of reaching by testing perturbations of visual feedback during movements in a virtual environment. Method: The subjects' task was to reach and touch a succession of targets in a virtual environment. Visual targets were aligned with a tabletop, which provided consistent haptic feedback. Images presented by a monitor were viewed through a horizontal mirror, using shutter glasses to present left and right stereo views. The mirror occluded subjects' view of their hand. Visual feedback was provided by a sphere representing a subject's fingertip ( a virtual finger), which was updated in real-time using an optical tracking system and markers on a subjects' finger. In a baseline condition, the virtual finger accurately tracked the location of the unseen finger throughout a trial. In perturbed trials, a small discrepancy (2cm) between the actual and virtual finger was added at variable points during a movement. Perturbation onsets were gradual to be less noticeable. Results: Across perturbed trials, hand trajectories typically showed an adjustment at the end of a movement to correct error in the initial reach. When perturbations were early in the movement, there were also corrective adjustments before approaching the target. Detectable responses were observed as early as 40% of the way along the movement path, with delays of around 200ms. Conclusion: Visual feedback from the hand is used not only to control fine adjustments at the end of a reach, but also to guide movement during the initial phase of reaching.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.titleResponse to perturbations of visual feedback during reaching movementsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSaunders, J:jsaun@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySaunders, J=rp00638en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/1.3.1en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4143063863en_US
dc.identifier.volume1en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage1aen_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000206970700001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaunders, J=7402341514en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKnill, D=7003848696en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats