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Article: Self-construal and social comparison effects

TitleSelf-construal and social comparison effects
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jEP_1.cfm
Citation
British Journal Of Educational Psychology, 2007, v. 77 n. 1, p. 197-211 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Social comparison research usually demonstrates that students will have higher self-evaluation in downward comparison but lower self-evaluation in upward comparison. However, the existence of this contrast effect may depend on people's self-construal. The contrast effect may exist only for people with independent self-construal. For people with interdependent self-construal, the contrast effect may be attenuated. Aim. The study investigated the role of self-construal as a moderator of the social comparison effects in authentic classrooms. Sample. The participants were 96 Chinese seventh-grade students (41 male, 51 female and 4 unreported) from a secondary school in Hong Kong. Method. The experiment employed a 2 × 2 between-subjects design based on 2 levels of self-construal (independent, interdependent) and 2 levels of comparison standard (upward comparison, downward comparison). The dependent variable was students' self-evaluation. Results. A two-way ANOVA indicated a significant interaction between self-construal and comparison standard on self-evaluation. When the students' independent self-construal was activated, they reported higher self-evaluation in downward comparison but lower self-evaluation in upward comparison. However, such a contrast effect was attenuated when the students' interdependent self-construal was activated. They reported high self-evaluation in both upward and downward comparisons. Conclusions. The outcome of social comparison depends on whether independent or interdependent self-construal is salient in the classroom. © 2007 The British Psychological Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169019
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.0
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.304
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, RWYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, SFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:40:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:40:49Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Educational Psychology, 2007, v. 77 n. 1, p. 197-211en_US
dc.identifier.issn0007-0998en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169019-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Social comparison research usually demonstrates that students will have higher self-evaluation in downward comparison but lower self-evaluation in upward comparison. However, the existence of this contrast effect may depend on people's self-construal. The contrast effect may exist only for people with independent self-construal. For people with interdependent self-construal, the contrast effect may be attenuated. Aim. The study investigated the role of self-construal as a moderator of the social comparison effects in authentic classrooms. Sample. The participants were 96 Chinese seventh-grade students (41 male, 51 female and 4 unreported) from a secondary school in Hong Kong. Method. The experiment employed a 2 × 2 between-subjects design based on 2 levels of self-construal (independent, interdependent) and 2 levels of comparison standard (upward comparison, downward comparison). The dependent variable was students' self-evaluation. Results. A two-way ANOVA indicated a significant interaction between self-construal and comparison standard on self-evaluation. When the students' independent self-construal was activated, they reported higher self-evaluation in downward comparison but lower self-evaluation in upward comparison. However, such a contrast effect was attenuated when the students' interdependent self-construal was activated. They reported high self-evaluation in both upward and downward comparisons. Conclusions. The outcome of social comparison depends on whether independent or interdependent self-construal is salient in the classroom. © 2007 The British Psychological Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jEP_1.cfmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Educational Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnalysis Of Varianceen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Concepten_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Identificationen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Perceptionen_US
dc.subject.meshStudentsen_US
dc.titleSelf-construal and social comparison effectsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, SF:lamsf@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, SF=rp00568en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1348/000709905X72795en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17411495-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33947270537en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros132827-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33947270537&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume77en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage197en_US
dc.identifier.epage211en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000244956200011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, RWY=16041291000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, SF=7402279467en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike1184910-

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