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Article: Perceived heading biased by a moving object: Effects of disparity and object position

TitlePerceived heading biased by a moving object: Effects of disparity and object position
Authors
Issue Date1996
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iovs.org
Citation
Investigative Ophthalmology And Visual Science, 1996, v. 37 n. 3, p. S454 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: We have previously reported that perceived direction of heading can be biased by the presence of a moving object that covers the focus of expansion (ARVO 94, 95). The heading error induced by opaque objects can even be greater than those with transparent objects, despite clear dynamic occlusion boundaries for segmentation. This suggests that the scene is not segmented on the basis of motion information prior to determining heading. In the present experiments, we added stereo as a segmentation cue. Since disparity is known to modulate responses of motion cells in area MT, it could act to reduce the heading bias. We also examined effects of initial object position with respect to the focus of expansion. Method: Displays simulated observer translation toward a frontal background plane with an independently moving opaque object closer in depth. Subjects adjusted a probe to indicate their perceived heading with respect to the background, ignoring the moving object. In the Stereo condition, both disparities and optic flow specified object boundaries and motion, while in the No Stereo condition, motion alone did so. In a second experiment, the initial position of the object with respect to the focus of expansion and the object's direction of motion in depth were parametrically varied. Results: Similar heading errors were observed in both the Stereo and No Stereo condition, indicating that disparity information does not reduce the bias. Effects of initial position will also be reported. Conclusion: Our results provide further evidence that the scene is not segmented prior to determining heading, such that heading perception appears to be based on global pooling of optic flow. We describe a heading model based on properties of MT and MST that can account for the data.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169014
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.427
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.008

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, JAen_US
dc.contributor.authorWarren, WHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:40:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:40:45Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.citationInvestigative Ophthalmology And Visual Science, 1996, v. 37 n. 3, p. S454en_US
dc.identifier.issn0146-0404en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169014-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: We have previously reported that perceived direction of heading can be biased by the presence of a moving object that covers the focus of expansion (ARVO 94, 95). The heading error induced by opaque objects can even be greater than those with transparent objects, despite clear dynamic occlusion boundaries for segmentation. This suggests that the scene is not segmented on the basis of motion information prior to determining heading. In the present experiments, we added stereo as a segmentation cue. Since disparity is known to modulate responses of motion cells in area MT, it could act to reduce the heading bias. We also examined effects of initial object position with respect to the focus of expansion. Method: Displays simulated observer translation toward a frontal background plane with an independently moving opaque object closer in depth. Subjects adjusted a probe to indicate their perceived heading with respect to the background, ignoring the moving object. In the Stereo condition, both disparities and optic flow specified object boundaries and motion, while in the No Stereo condition, motion alone did so. In a second experiment, the initial position of the object with respect to the focus of expansion and the object's direction of motion in depth were parametrically varied. Results: Similar heading errors were observed in both the Stereo and No Stereo condition, indicating that disparity information does not reduce the bias. Effects of initial position will also be reported. Conclusion: Our results provide further evidence that the scene is not segmented prior to determining heading, such that heading perception appears to be based on global pooling of optic flow. We describe a heading model based on properties of MT and MST that can account for the data.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iovs.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Scienceen_US
dc.titlePerceived heading biased by a moving object: Effects of disparity and object positionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSaunders, JA:jsaun@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySaunders, JA=rp00638en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33750184857en_US
dc.identifier.volume37en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spageS454en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaunders, JA=7402341514en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWarren, WH=34573732800en_US

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