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Article: Arf, perceived changes in position consistent with perceived self-motion?

TitleArf, perceived changes in position consistent with perceived self-motion?
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iovs.org
Citation
Investigative Ophthalmology And Visual Science, 1997, v. 38 n. 4, p. S79 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: II is possible to track (he egocentric position of an object during locomotion using cither perceived 3D layout and self-motion, or the 2D flow pattern. When perceived 3D path of self-motion is erroneous, are perceived object locations updated in a way consistent with the erroneous interpretation? Method: The task was to track a previously cued location on the ground during simulated self-motion for 2s, and then indicate its final position with a cursor. Three types of motion were simulated: movement on a circular path (Curved condition), movement along a straight path (Straight condition), and movement along a straight path while rotating (Rotating condition). Simulated translation and rotation is known to produce an illusion of travel on a curved path under these conditions. Therefore, if position judgments in the Rotating condition are based on the erroneous interpretation of self-motion, performance should be similar to the Curved condition, but if the 2D flow is used, performance would be the same as the straight condition. Results: For each condition, the mapping from initial positions to judged final positions was fit to a Euclidean transformation, which was used as a measure of the subjective change in observer position. The translational component of this transformation differed between the Curved and Straight conditions, but not between the Rotating and Straight conditions. Conclusion: Subjects appear to use the 2D flow pattern to track the egocentric positions of objects, even when these judgments are inconsistent with the perceived path of self-motion. This suggests (hat there is no single interpretation of 3D layout and self-motion.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169011
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.427
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.008

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, JAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:40:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:40:45Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.citationInvestigative Ophthalmology And Visual Science, 1997, v. 38 n. 4, p. S79en_US
dc.identifier.issn0146-0404en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169011-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: II is possible to track (he egocentric position of an object during locomotion using cither perceived 3D layout and self-motion, or the 2D flow pattern. When perceived 3D path of self-motion is erroneous, are perceived object locations updated in a way consistent with the erroneous interpretation? Method: The task was to track a previously cued location on the ground during simulated self-motion for 2s, and then indicate its final position with a cursor. Three types of motion were simulated: movement on a circular path (Curved condition), movement along a straight path (Straight condition), and movement along a straight path while rotating (Rotating condition). Simulated translation and rotation is known to produce an illusion of travel on a curved path under these conditions. Therefore, if position judgments in the Rotating condition are based on the erroneous interpretation of self-motion, performance should be similar to the Curved condition, but if the 2D flow is used, performance would be the same as the straight condition. Results: For each condition, the mapping from initial positions to judged final positions was fit to a Euclidean transformation, which was used as a measure of the subjective change in observer position. The translational component of this transformation differed between the Curved and Straight conditions, but not between the Rotating and Straight conditions. Conclusion: Subjects appear to use the 2D flow pattern to track the egocentric positions of objects, even when these judgments are inconsistent with the perceived path of self-motion. This suggests (hat there is no single interpretation of 3D layout and self-motion.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iovs.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Scienceen_US
dc.titleArf, perceived changes in position consistent with perceived self-motion?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSaunders, JA:jsaun@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySaunders, JA=rp00638en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33749094561en_US
dc.identifier.volume38en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spageS79en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaunders, JA=7402341514en_US

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