File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The accuracy and reliability of perceived depth from linear perspective as a function of image size

TitleThe accuracy and reliability of perceived depth from linear perspective as a function of image size
Authors
KeywordsBayesian Model
Depth Perception
Linear Perspective
Picture Perception
Slant Perception
Vision
Issue Date2006
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
Journal Of Vision, 2006, v. 6 n. 9 How to Cite?
AbstractWe investigated the ability to use linear perspective to perceive depth from monocular images. Specifically, we focused on the information provided by convergence of parallel lines in an image due to perspective projection. Our stimuli were trapezoid-shaped projected contours, which appear as rectangles slanted in depth. If converging edges of a contour are assumed to be parallel edges of a 3D object, then it is possible in principle to recover its 3D orientation and relative dimensions. This 3D interpretation depends on projected size; hence, if an image contour were scaled, accurate use of perspective predicts changes in perceived slant and shape. We tested this prediction and measured the accuracy and precision with which observers can judge depth from perspective alone. Observers viewed monocular images of slanted rectangles and judged whether the rectangles appeared longer versus wider than a square. The projected contours had varying widths (7, 14, or 21 deg) and side angles (7 or 25 deg), and heights were varied by a staircase procedure to compute a point of subjective equality and 75% threshold for each condition. Observers were able to reliably judge aspect ratios from the monocular images: Weber fractions were 6-9% for the largest rectangles, increasing to as high as 17% for small rectangles with high simulated slant. Overall, the contours judged to be squares were taller than the projections of actual squares, consistent with perceptual underestimation of depth. Judgments were modulated by image size in the direction expected from perspective geometry, but the effect of size was only about 20-30% of what was predicted. We simulated the performance of a Bayesian ideal observer that integrated perspective information with an a priori bias toward compression of depth and which was able to qualitatively model the pattern of results. © ARVO.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169009
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, JAen_US
dc.contributor.authorBackus, BTen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:40:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:40:44Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Vision, 2006, v. 6 n. 9en_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169009-
dc.description.abstractWe investigated the ability to use linear perspective to perceive depth from monocular images. Specifically, we focused on the information provided by convergence of parallel lines in an image due to perspective projection. Our stimuli were trapezoid-shaped projected contours, which appear as rectangles slanted in depth. If converging edges of a contour are assumed to be parallel edges of a 3D object, then it is possible in principle to recover its 3D orientation and relative dimensions. This 3D interpretation depends on projected size; hence, if an image contour were scaled, accurate use of perspective predicts changes in perceived slant and shape. We tested this prediction and measured the accuracy and precision with which observers can judge depth from perspective alone. Observers viewed monocular images of slanted rectangles and judged whether the rectangles appeared longer versus wider than a square. The projected contours had varying widths (7, 14, or 21 deg) and side angles (7 or 25 deg), and heights were varied by a staircase procedure to compute a point of subjective equality and 75% threshold for each condition. Observers were able to reliably judge aspect ratios from the monocular images: Weber fractions were 6-9% for the largest rectangles, increasing to as high as 17% for small rectangles with high simulated slant. Overall, the contours judged to be squares were taller than the projections of actual squares, consistent with perceptual underestimation of depth. Judgments were modulated by image size in the direction expected from perspective geometry, but the effect of size was only about 20-30% of what was predicted. We simulated the performance of a Bayesian ideal observer that integrated perspective information with an a priori bias toward compression of depth and which was able to qualitatively model the pattern of results. © ARVO.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.subjectBayesian Modelen_US
dc.subjectDepth Perceptionen_US
dc.subjectLinear Perspectiveen_US
dc.subjectPicture Perceptionen_US
dc.subjectSlant Perceptionen_US
dc.subjectVisionen_US
dc.titleThe accuracy and reliability of perceived depth from linear perspective as a function of image sizeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSaunders, JA:jsaun@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySaunders, JA=rp00638en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/6.9.7en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17083286-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33747689947en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33747689947&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume6en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000243594000007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaunders, JA=7402341514en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBackus, BT=7003366612en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike6502978-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats