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Article: Demonstration of cue recruitment: Change in visual appearance by means of Pavlovian conditioning

TitleDemonstration of cue recruitment: Change in visual appearance by means of Pavlovian conditioning
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org
Citation
Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2006, v. 103 n. 2, p. 483-488 How to Cite?
AbstractUntil half a century ago, associative learning played a fundamental role in theories of perceptual appearance [Berkeley, G. (1709) An Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision (Dublin), 1st Ed.]. But starting in 1955 [Gibson, J. J. & Gibson, E. J. (1955) Psychol. Rev. 62, 32-41], most studies of perceptual learning have not been concerned with association or appearance but rather with improvements in discrimination ability. Here we describe a "cue recruitment" experiment, which is a straightforward adaptation of Pavlov's classical conditioning experiment, that we used to measure changes in visual appearance caused by exposure to novel pairings of signals in visual stimuli. Trainees viewed movies of a rotating wire-frame (Necker) cube. This stimulus is perceptually bistable. On training trials, depth cues (stereo and occlusion) were added to force the perceived direction of rotation. Critically, an additional signal was also added, contingent on rotation direction. Stimuli on test trials contained the new signal but not the depth cues. Over 45 min, two of the three new signals that we tested acquired the ability to bias perceived rotation direction on their own. Results were consistent across the eight trainees in each experiment, and the new cue's effectiveness was long lasting. Whereas most adaptation aftereffects on appearance are opposite in direction to the training stimuli, these effects were positive. An individual new signal can be recruited by the visual system as a cue for the construction of visual appearance. Cue recruitment experiments may prove useful for reexamining of the role of experience in perception. © 2005 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169000
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 9.423
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.883
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHaijiang, Qen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, JAen_US
dc.contributor.authorStone, RWen_US
dc.contributor.authorBackus, BTen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:40:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:40:39Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationProceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2006, v. 103 n. 2, p. 483-488en_US
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169000-
dc.description.abstractUntil half a century ago, associative learning played a fundamental role in theories of perceptual appearance [Berkeley, G. (1709) An Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision (Dublin), 1st Ed.]. But starting in 1955 [Gibson, J. J. & Gibson, E. J. (1955) Psychol. Rev. 62, 32-41], most studies of perceptual learning have not been concerned with association or appearance but rather with improvements in discrimination ability. Here we describe a "cue recruitment" experiment, which is a straightforward adaptation of Pavlov's classical conditioning experiment, that we used to measure changes in visual appearance caused by exposure to novel pairings of signals in visual stimuli. Trainees viewed movies of a rotating wire-frame (Necker) cube. This stimulus is perceptually bistable. On training trials, depth cues (stereo and occlusion) were added to force the perceived direction of rotation. Critically, an additional signal was also added, contingent on rotation direction. Stimuli on test trials contained the new signal but not the depth cues. Over 45 min, two of the three new signals that we tested acquired the ability to bias perceived rotation direction on their own. Results were consistent across the eight trainees in each experiment, and the new cue's effectiveness was long lasting. Whereas most adaptation aftereffects on appearance are opposite in direction to the training stimuli, these effects were positive. An individual new signal can be recruited by the visual system as a cue for the construction of visual appearance. Cue recruitment experiments may prove useful for reexamining of the role of experience in perception. © 2005 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of Americaen_US
dc.subject.meshConditioning, Classical - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCuesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Neurologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshVisual Perception - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleDemonstration of cue recruitment: Change in visual appearance by means of Pavlovian conditioningen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSaunders, JA:jsaun@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySaunders, JA=rp00638en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.0506728103en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16387858-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-31044437682en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-31044437682&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume103en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage483en_US
dc.identifier.epage488en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHaijiang, Q=11739876400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaunders, JA=7402341514en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStone, RW=11739430300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBackus, BT=7003366612en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike3399678-

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