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Article: Humans use continuous visual feedback from the hand to control both the direction and distance of pointing movements

TitleHumans use continuous visual feedback from the hand to control both the direction and distance of pointing movements
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00221/index.htm
Citation
Experimental Brain Research, 2005, v. 162 n. 4, p. 458-473 How to Cite?
AbstractVision of the hand during reaching provides dynamic feedback that can be used to control movement. We investigated the relative contributions of feedback about the direction and distance of the hand relative to a target. Subjects made pointing movements in a 3-D virtual environment, in which a small sphere provided dynamic visual feedback about the position of their unseen fingertip. On a subset of trials, the position of the virtual fingertip was smoothly shifted by 2 cm during movement, either (1) in the direction of movement, which would require adjustments to the distance moved, or (2) orthogonal to the direction of movement, which would require adjustments to the direction moved. Despite not noticing the perturbations, subjects adjusted their movements to compensate for both types of visual shifts. Corrective responses to direction perturbations were observed within 117 ms, and response latencies were invariant to movement speed and perturbation onset time. Initial corrections to distance perturbations were smaller and appeared after longer delays of 130-200 ms, and both the speed and magnitude of responses were reduced for early onset perturbations. Simulations of a feedback control model that optimally integrates visual information over time show that the results can be explained by differences in the sensory noise levels in the visual dimensions relevant for direction and distance control. © Springer-Verlag 2005.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168986
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.140
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, JAen_US
dc.contributor.authorKnill, DCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:40:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:40:30Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationExperimental Brain Research, 2005, v. 162 n. 4, p. 458-473en_US
dc.identifier.issn0014-4819en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168986-
dc.description.abstractVision of the hand during reaching provides dynamic feedback that can be used to control movement. We investigated the relative contributions of feedback about the direction and distance of the hand relative to a target. Subjects made pointing movements in a 3-D virtual environment, in which a small sphere provided dynamic visual feedback about the position of their unseen fingertip. On a subset of trials, the position of the virtual fingertip was smoothly shifted by 2 cm during movement, either (1) in the direction of movement, which would require adjustments to the distance moved, or (2) orthogonal to the direction of movement, which would require adjustments to the direction moved. Despite not noticing the perturbations, subjects adjusted their movements to compensate for both types of visual shifts. Corrective responses to direction perturbations were observed within 117 ms, and response latencies were invariant to movement speed and perturbation onset time. Initial corrections to distance perturbations were smaller and appeared after longer delays of 130-200 ms, and both the speed and magnitude of responses were reduced for early onset perturbations. Simulations of a feedback control model that optimally integrates visual information over time show that the results can be explained by differences in the sensory noise levels in the visual dimensions relevant for direction and distance control. © Springer-Verlag 2005.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00221/index.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofExperimental Brain Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Physiological - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFeedback - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHand - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Neurologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshMotion Perception - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMovement - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNeuropsychological Testsen_US
dc.subject.meshOrientation - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhotic Stimulationen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychomotor Performance - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshReaction Time - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSpace Perception - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshUser-Computer Interfaceen_US
dc.titleHumans use continuous visual feedback from the hand to control both the direction and distance of pointing movementsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSaunders, JA:jsaun@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySaunders, JA=rp00638en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00221-004-2064-1en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15754182-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-18844364678en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-18844364678&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume162en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage458en_US
dc.identifier.epage473en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000228858900006-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaunders, JA=7402341514en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKnill, DC=7003848696en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike570448-

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