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Article: Letter-recognition and reading speed in peripheral vision benefit from perceptual learning

TitleLetter-recognition and reading speed in peripheral vision benefit from perceptual learning
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/visres
Citation
Vision Research, 2004, v. 44 n. 7, p. 695-709 How to Cite?
AbstractVisual-span profiles are plots of letter-recognition accuracy as a function of letter position left or right of the midline. Previously, we have shown that contraction of these profiles in peripheral vision can account for slow reading speed in peripheral vision. In this study, we asked two questions: (1) can we modify visual-span profiles through training on letter-recognition, and if so, (2) are these changes accompanied by changes in reading speed? Eighteen normally sighted observers were randomly assigned to one of three groups: training at 10° in the upper visual field, training at 10° in the lower visual field and a no-training control group. We compared observers' characteristics of reading (maximum reading speed and critical print size) and visual-span profiles (peak amplitude and bits of information transmitted) before and after training, and at trained and untrained retinal locations (10° upper and lower visual fields). Reading speeds were measured for six print sizes at each retinal location, using the rapid serial visual presentation paradigm. Visual-span profiles were measured using a trigram letter-recognition task, for a letter size equivalent to 1.4× the critical print size for reading. Training consisted of the repeated measurement of 20 visual-span profiles (over four consecutive days) in either the upper or lower visual field. We also tracked the changes in performance in a sub-group of observers for up to three months following training. We found that the visual-span profiles can be expanded (bits of information transmitted increased by 6 bits) through training with a letter-recognition task, and that there is an accompanying increase (41%) in the maximum reading speed. These improvements transferred, to a large extent, from the trained to an untrained retinal location, and were retained, to a large extent, for at least three months following training. Our results are consistent with the view that the visual span is a bottleneck on reading speed, but a bottleneck that can be increased with practice. © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168980
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.776
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.957
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChung, STLen_US
dc.contributor.authorLegge, GEen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, SHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:40:26Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:40:26Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationVision Research, 2004, v. 44 n. 7, p. 695-709en_US
dc.identifier.issn0042-6989en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168980-
dc.description.abstractVisual-span profiles are plots of letter-recognition accuracy as a function of letter position left or right of the midline. Previously, we have shown that contraction of these profiles in peripheral vision can account for slow reading speed in peripheral vision. In this study, we asked two questions: (1) can we modify visual-span profiles through training on letter-recognition, and if so, (2) are these changes accompanied by changes in reading speed? Eighteen normally sighted observers were randomly assigned to one of three groups: training at 10° in the upper visual field, training at 10° in the lower visual field and a no-training control group. We compared observers' characteristics of reading (maximum reading speed and critical print size) and visual-span profiles (peak amplitude and bits of information transmitted) before and after training, and at trained and untrained retinal locations (10° upper and lower visual fields). Reading speeds were measured for six print sizes at each retinal location, using the rapid serial visual presentation paradigm. Visual-span profiles were measured using a trigram letter-recognition task, for a letter size equivalent to 1.4× the critical print size for reading. Training consisted of the repeated measurement of 20 visual-span profiles (over four consecutive days) in either the upper or lower visual field. We also tracked the changes in performance in a sub-group of observers for up to three months following training. We found that the visual-span profiles can be expanded (bits of information transmitted increased by 6 bits) through training with a letter-recognition task, and that there is an accompanying increase (41%) in the maximum reading speed. These improvements transferred, to a large extent, from the trained to an untrained retinal location, and were retained, to a large extent, for at least three months following training. Our results are consistent with the view that the visual span is a bottleneck on reading speed, but a bottleneck that can be increased with practice. © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/visresen_US
dc.relation.ispartofVision Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAnalysis Of Varianceen_US
dc.subject.meshEye Movements - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLearningen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychophysicsen_US
dc.subject.meshReadingen_US
dc.subject.meshRecognition (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.meshVisual Perception - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleLetter-recognition and reading speed in peripheral vision benefit from perceptual learningen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, SH:singhang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, SH=rp00590en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.visres.2003.09.028en_US
dc.identifier.pmid14751554-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2729075-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1642483440en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-1642483440&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume44en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage695en_US
dc.identifier.epage709en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000188890100006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, STL=10440472700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLegge, GE=7005064208en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, SH=7202473508en_US

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