File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Humans optimally weight stereo and texture cues to estimate surface slant

TitleHumans optimally weight stereo and texture cues to estimate surface slant
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
Journal Of Vision, 2002, v. 2 n. 7, p. 400a How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: The optimal, linear way to combine information from multiple cues is to weight cues according to their reliability. Previous work has shown that subjects adapt their cue weighting in response to global parameters that affect cue reliability (e.g. viewing distance for stereo). Cue reliability, however, can also vary with the value of the parameter(s) being estimated. Texture is a highly reliable cue for surface slant at high slants, but is much less reliable at low slants. We tested whether subjects' weighting of texture and stereo cues varies as a function of surface slant in an optimal manner. We further tested whether inter-subject differences in cue weights are predicted by the relative reliability with which subjects individually discriminate slant from the two cues in isolation. Method: In a first experiment, we used a 2-AFC task to measure thresholds for discriminating slant from texture alone (monocular views of random tiled textures), stereo alone (binocular views of random dot patterns) and texture and stereo combined (binocular views of random tiled textures). In the second part, we used a similar psychophysical procedure to measure points of subjective equality between stimuli with small cue conflicts and those without, as a way of measuring the weights given by subjects to stereo and texture cues. Results: Discrimination thresholds for slant from texture decreased relative to thresholds for slant from stereo as surface slant increased. As predicted by theory, subjects' texture weights correspondingly increased with increasing slant. Moreover, after subtracting the main effect of slant on texture and stereo weights, individual subjects' relative stereo / texture thresholds accounted for 60% of the remaining variability in cue weights. Conclusions: Subjects weight stereo and texture cues for slant in a manner consistent with the uncertainty of their of their own estimates of slant from the cues, as predicted by an optimal model.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168970
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKnill, DCen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:40:17Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:40:17Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Vision, 2002, v. 2 n. 7, p. 400aen_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168970-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The optimal, linear way to combine information from multiple cues is to weight cues according to their reliability. Previous work has shown that subjects adapt their cue weighting in response to global parameters that affect cue reliability (e.g. viewing distance for stereo). Cue reliability, however, can also vary with the value of the parameter(s) being estimated. Texture is a highly reliable cue for surface slant at high slants, but is much less reliable at low slants. We tested whether subjects' weighting of texture and stereo cues varies as a function of surface slant in an optimal manner. We further tested whether inter-subject differences in cue weights are predicted by the relative reliability with which subjects individually discriminate slant from the two cues in isolation. Method: In a first experiment, we used a 2-AFC task to measure thresholds for discriminating slant from texture alone (monocular views of random tiled textures), stereo alone (binocular views of random dot patterns) and texture and stereo combined (binocular views of random tiled textures). In the second part, we used a similar psychophysical procedure to measure points of subjective equality between stimuli with small cue conflicts and those without, as a way of measuring the weights given by subjects to stereo and texture cues. Results: Discrimination thresholds for slant from texture decreased relative to thresholds for slant from stereo as surface slant increased. As predicted by theory, subjects' texture weights correspondingly increased with increasing slant. Moreover, after subtracting the main effect of slant on texture and stereo weights, individual subjects' relative stereo / texture thresholds accounted for 60% of the remaining variability in cue weights. Conclusions: Subjects weight stereo and texture cues for slant in a manner consistent with the uncertainty of their of their own estimates of slant from the cues, as predicted by an optimal model.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.titleHumans optimally weight stereo and texture cues to estimate surface slanten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSaunders, J:jsaun@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySaunders, J=rp00638en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/2.7.400en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0041725043en_US
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage400aen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKnill, DC=7003848696en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaunders, J=7402341514en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats