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Article: Detection of three types of changes to novel objects

TitleDetection of three types of changes to novel objects
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13506285.asp
Citation
Visual Cognition, 2003, v. 10 n. 1, p. 101-127 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this study a change-detection paradigm is used to explore the nature of the information used to recognize three-dimensional, novel objects. In particular, whether we are sensitive to changes in part identity or configuration information. Experiments 1 and 2 showed that configural changes made to the object parts were significantly easier and quicker to detect than changes made to the shape or arrangement of object parts. Variance due to the total change in pixels did not predict performance in either of the experiments. The results of Experiment 3 showed the same pattern as Experiments 1 and 2, even though the objects used were altered to make part identity information more salient. Experiment 4 demonstrated that the physical size of the changes is not the crucial variable for this pattern of results. These findings are discussed in relation to the nature of visual representations and theories of object recognition.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168960
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.433
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.905
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKeane, SKen_US
dc.contributor.authorHayward, WGen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:40:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:40:09Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationVisual Cognition, 2003, v. 10 n. 1, p. 101-127en_US
dc.identifier.issn1350-6285en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168960-
dc.description.abstractIn this study a change-detection paradigm is used to explore the nature of the information used to recognize three-dimensional, novel objects. In particular, whether we are sensitive to changes in part identity or configuration information. Experiments 1 and 2 showed that configural changes made to the object parts were significantly easier and quicker to detect than changes made to the shape or arrangement of object parts. Variance due to the total change in pixels did not predict performance in either of the experiments. The results of Experiment 3 showed the same pattern as Experiments 1 and 2, even though the objects used were altered to make part identity information more salient. Experiment 4 demonstrated that the physical size of the changes is not the crucial variable for this pattern of results. These findings are discussed in relation to the nature of visual representations and theories of object recognition.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13506285.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofVisual Cognitionen_US
dc.titleDetection of three types of changes to novel objectsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHayward, WG:whayward@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHayward, WG=rp00630en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037247858en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037247858&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume10en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage101en_US
dc.identifier.epage127en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKeane, SK=7003952438en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHayward, WG=7006352956en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBurke, D=7403247378en_US

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